Slavic

http://slavic.barnard.edu/

226 Milbank Hall
212-854-5417
212-854-8266 (fax)
Department Assistant: Mary Missirian

Mission

The primary mission of the Slavic Department at Barnard is to prepare students linguistically, culturally, and academically to participate in the global community, specifically by engaging with the Slavic-speaking world.  To this end, the Department, in cooperation with its Columbia counterpart, offers instruction in five Slavic languages and literatures, with particular emphasis on Russian. The department insists upon a strong foundation in language study, because this best prepares students for future involvement with the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia, as well as for graduate study in the literature, anthropology, sociology, history, economics, or politics of the region, and for careers in government, business, journalism, or international law.

The department offers major tracks in Russian Language and Literature, Slavic and East European Literature and Culture, Russian Regional Studies, and Slavic and East European Regional Studies.  A minor program in Russian Literature and Culture is also available.  These programs are supported by an extensive array of courses designed to help the student obtain reasonable fluency in the spoken and written language and a reading ability adequate for interpreting texts of some difficulty in a variety of disciplines. While offering a range of courses designed to give the student a strong general background in Russian and Slavic literature, film, culture, and intellectual history, the department encourages students to supplement their knowledge by taking courses devoted to Russia, the former Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe offered in other disciplines as well. The department co-sponsors and facilitates student participation in region-related extra-curricular activities held at the Harriman Institute and the Columbia Slavic Department and also fosters student engagement with the rich cultural resources available in New York City.

Student Learning Outcomes

In recognition of the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning published by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, the Slavic Department expects the following outcomes for students in each of its major tracks:

  • Communication.  Students should be able to communicate orally and in writing in the language of study, and understand and interpret written and spoken language on a variety of topics.
  • Cultures.  Students should demonstrate an understanding of the perspectives, products, and practices of the culture studied.
  • Connections.  Students should be able to acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints available to them through the foreign language and its cultures.
  • Comparisons.  Students should develop comparative insights into the nature of language and culture as a result of studying a language and culture other than their own.
  • Communities.  Students should be prepared to participate in multilingual communities at home and around the world.

In addition, the Department expects the following outcomes of all majors:

  • Students should demonstrate broad knowledge of at least one major aspect (e.g. literature, politics, or history) of the culture studied
  • Students should acquire and convey, in an appropriate academic form, deep knowledge of a particular topic or question relating to the culture studied

Entering students should see Professor Frank Miller (708 Hamilton, 854-3941) for a placement examination: a sufficiently high grade will automatically fulfill the language requirement; other students will be placed accordingly. Native speakers of Russian or any Slavic language should consult with the department chair. The Department is a member of "Dobro Slovo" (The National Slavic Honor Society) and is pleased to induct its qualifying students into the society.

Acting Chair: Helene Foley (Professor of Classics)
Term Assistant Professor: Bradley Gorski
Adjunct Lecturers: Irina Denischenko and Vasiliy Lvov

Other officers of the University offering courses in Slavic:

Professors: Valentina Izmirlieva (CHAIR), Liza Knapp (Director, Undergraduate Studies), Cathy Popkin (Director, Graduate Studies), Irina Reyfman (Director of Undergraduate Studies), Alan Timberlake
Associate Professor:
Assistant Professors: Adam E. Leeds, Jessica E. Merrill, Alla Smyslova (Russian Language Program Director)
Lecturers: Aleksandar Boskovic, Christopher Harwood, Nataliya Kun, Mona M. Momescu, Yuri Shevchuk,

Requirements for the Major

There are four majors available to students in the department. Prospective students are encouraged to consult with a member of the faculty as early as possible in order to determine the major track and selection of courses that will best serve her background and interests.

Russian Language and Literature

Select four years of Russian: *
RUSS UN1101
 - RUSS UN1102
First-year Russian I
and First-year Russian II
10
RUSS UN1201
 - RUSS UN2102
Second-year Russian I
and Second-year Russian II
10
RUSS UN3101
 - RUSS UN3102
Third-year Russian I
and Third-Year Russian II
8
RUSS UN3430
 - RUSS UN3431
Russian for Heritage Speakers I
and Russian for Heritage Speakers II
6
RUSS W4333Fourth-year Russian I4
RUSS GU4334Fourth-year Russian II4
Select six courses in Russian Literatures to include: **
RUSS UN3220Literature and Empire: The Reign of the Novel in Russia (19th Century) [In English]3
RUSS UN3221Literature & Revolution [In English]3
At least two courses with required reading in Russian
RUSS UN3595Senior Seminar3
*

Native speakers of Russian who place out of these courses must substitute at least two courses, of which one must be RUSS UN3430 Russian for Heritage Speakers I

**

Other Russian literature courses may be substituted upon consultation with adviser. With permission of adviser one course on Russia offered in a department other than Slavic may be substituted.

Slavic and East European Literature and Culture

Completion of third-year course (or the equivalent in Czech, Polish, Serbo-Croatian, or Ukrainian language
Select six courses in literature, theatre, or film of the region, potentially including independent study courses
Select two courses in related fields (history, art history, music, etc.) to include at least one course in the history of the region
Select two semesters of senior seminar or the equivalent leading to the completion of a senior thesis

Note: A student in this major must design her program in close consultation with her adviser in order to insure intellectual, disciplinary, and regional coherence.

Russian Regional Studies

Select four years of Russian:
RUSS UN1101
 - RUSS UN1102
First-year Russian I
and First-year Russian II
10
RUSS UN1201
 - RUSS UN2102
Second-year Russian I
and Second-year Russian II
10
Select two courses in Russian or Soviet Literature (in translation or in Russian)
RUSS UN3101Third-year Russian I4
RUSS UN3102Third-Year Russian II4
RUSS W4333Fourth-year Russian I4
RUSS GU4334Fourth-year Russian II4
Select two courses in Russian History
Select one course on Russia or the Soviet Union in any discipline (history, art history, geography, sociology, economics, literature, political science, etc.)
Select one course in Soviet/post-Soviet politics
Two semesters of a senior research seminar or the equivalent in independent study with research to be conducted predominantly in Russian language sources

Note: In consultation with her adviser, a student may elect to take one or more courses devoted to a region other than Russia that is located on the territory of the former Soviet Union.

Slavic and East European Regional Studies Major-Czech, Polish, Serbo-Croatian, Ukrainian

Select three years of language study
Select two courses Literature in relevant region
Select two courses of history in relevant region
Select one course on relevant region in any discipline (history, art history, geography, sociology, economics, literature, political science, etc.)
One course on politics in relevant region
Two semester of a senior research seminar or the equivalent in independent study with research to be conducted predominantly in relevant region's language sources

Requirements for the Minor

Minor in Russian

The Minor in Russian allows students to study the language and culture of Russia at a smaller scale than a Major. A total of five courses (minimum 15 credits) beyond the second year of Russian are required. These courses should relate to the language and culture of Russia. Courses should be selected in consultation with a Slavic Department faculty member.

Minor in Czech, Polish, Serbo-Croatian or Ukrainian

A Minor in a Slavic language other than Russian allow students to pursue in-depth studies of this language and the region on a smaller scale than the one required for a Major. The Barnard Minor in Czech, Polish, Serbo-Croatian or Ukrainian consists of five courses (minimum 15 credits) beyond the second year of language study. It requires that three (3) of these courses be related to the country of the language (Poland, Czech Republic, etc) while the other two (2) should be related to the region and its cultural history more broadly.

Russian Language

RUSS UN1101 First-year Russian I. 5 points.

Grammar, reading, composition, and conversation.

Fall 2017: RUSS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 1101 001/17926 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
709 Hamilton Hall
Ben Hooyman 5 15/12
RUSS 1101 002/18272 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
709 Hamilton Hall
Nataliya Kun 5 10/12
RUSS 1101 003/24192 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
709 Hamilton Hall
William Hanlon 5 9/12
RUSS 1101 004/29872 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Michael Gluck 5 7/12

RUSS UN1102 First-year Russian II. 5 points.

Grammar, reading, composition, and conversation.

Spring 2018: RUSS UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 1102 001/25124 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
709 Hamilton Hall
Ben Hooyman 5 12/12
RUSS 1102 002/61261 M T W Th 10:10am - 11:15am
709 Hamilton Hall
Nataliya Kun 5 5/12
RUSS 1102 003/66310 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
616 Hamilton Hall
William Hanlon 5 9/12
RUSS 1102 004/75381 M T W Th 6:10pm - 7:15pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Michael Gluck 5 7/12

RUSS UN1201 Second-year Russian I. 5 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN1102 or results of the Department placement test.

Drill practice in small groups. Reading, composition, and grammar review. This course number has been changed to RUSS 2101

RUSS UN2102 Second-year Russian II. 5 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN2101 or the equivalent.

Drill practice in small groups. Reading, composition, and grammar review.

Spring 2018: RUSS UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 2102 001/05672 M T W Th 8:50am - 9:55am
707 Hamilton Hall
Serhii Tereshchenko 5 5/12
RUSS 2102 002/66693 M T W Th 11:40am - 12:45pm
709 Hamilton Hall
Alexey Pekov 5 9/12
RUSS 2102 003/27488 M T W Th 1:10pm - 2:15pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Erica Drennan 5 7/12

RUSS UN3102 Third-Year Russian II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS UN2102 or the equivalent and the instructor's permission.

Enrollment limited. Recommended for students who wish to improve their active command of Russian. Emphasis on conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of selected texts and videotapes. Lectures. Papers and oral reports required. Conducted entirely in Russian.

Spring 2018: RUSS UN3102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3102 001/14463 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
609 Hamilton Hall
Alla Smyslova 4 9/12
RUSS 3102 002/27288 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Nataliya Kun 4 7/12

RUSS UN3430 Russian for Heritage Speakers I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS V3430 or the instructor's permission.

This course is designed to help students who speak Russian at home, but have no or limited reading and writing skills to develop literary skills in Russian. THIS COURSE, TAKEN WITH RUSS V3431, MEET A TWO YEAR FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT. Conducted in Russian.

Fall 2017: RUSS UN3430
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3430 001/28937 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Alla Smyslova 3 16/15

RUSS UN3431 Russian for Heritage Speakers II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: RUSS V3430 or the instructor's permission.

This course is designed to help students who speak Russian at home, but have no or limited reading and writing skills to develop literary skills in Russian. THIS COURSE, TAKEN WITH RUSS V3430, MEET A TWO YEAR FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT. Conducted in Russian.

Spring 2018: RUSS UN3431
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3431 001/61613 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
315 Hamilton Hall
Alla Smyslova 3 14/15

RUSS GU4333 Fourth-year Russian I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Three years of college Russian and the instructor's permission.

Systematic study of problems in Russian syntax; written exercises, translations into Russian, and compositions. Conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS GU4334 Fourth-year Russian II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: three years of college Russian and the instructor's permission.

Discussion of different styles and levels of language, including word usage and idiomatic expression; written exercises, analysis of texts, and compositions. Conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS GU4350 Moving to Advanced-Plus: Language, Culture, Society in Russian Today. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Six semesters of college Russian and the instructor’s permission.

The course is designed to provide advanced and highly-motivated undergraduate and graduate students of various majors with an opportunity to develop professional vocabulary and discourse devices that will help them to discuss their professional fields in Russian with fluency and accuracy. The course targets all four language competencies: speaking, listening, reading and writing, as well as cultural understanding. Conducted in Russian.

Fall 2017: RUSS GU4350
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4350 001/26623 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Alla Smyslova 3 8/15

RUSS GU4910 Literary Translation. 4 points.

Prerequisites: four years of college Russian or the equivalent.

Workshop in literary translation from Russian into English focusing on the practical problems of the craft. Each student submits a translation of a literary text for group study and criticism. The aim is to produce translations of publishable quality.

Fall 2017: RUSS GU4910
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4910 001/27735 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Ronald Meyer 4 7/12

Slavic and Comparative Literature

RUSS UN3220 Literature and Empire: The Reign of the Novel in Russia (19th Century) [In English]. 3 points.

Explores the aesthetic and formal developments in Russian prose, especially the rise of the monumental 19th-century novel, as one manifestation of a complex array of national and cultural aspirations, humanistic and imperialist ones alike. Works by Pushkin, Lermonotov, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov. Knowledge of Russian not required.

Fall 2017: RUSS UN3220
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3220 001/65562 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
303 Hamilton Hall
Cathy Popkin 3 18/40

CLRS UN3304 How To Read Violence: The Literature of Power, Force and Brutality from 20th Century Russia and America. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course seeks to understand how authors and filmmakers in the 20th century communicate the experience of violence to their audiences. We will discuss how fragmentation, montage, language breakdown and other techniques not only depict violence, but reflect that violence in artistic forms. We will also ask what representing violence does to the artistic work. Can the attempt to convey violence become an act of violence in itself? We will consider texts from Vladimir Mayakovsky, John Dos Passos, Andrei Platonov, Vasiliy Grossman, Allen Ginsberg, Anna Akhmatova, Richard Wright, Cormac McCarthy, Vladimir Sorokin, as well as films from Sergei Eisenstein, Alexei Balabanov and Quentin Tarantino. Full course description and syllabus available at readingviolence.weebly.com.

Fall 2017: CLRS UN3304
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLRS 3304 001/04014 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
303 Altschul Hall
Bradley Gorski 3 12

CLRS UN3307 (Russian) Literary Playgrounds: Adventures in Textual Paichnidology. 3 points.

There's a lot to be said for the virtues of play!  This course proceeds from the notion that while we may be accustomed to considering it as little more than frivolous activity, play is a serious business with great potential for enriching our social, creative, and scholarly lives.  Over the course of the semester we will read a number of theorists and authors who suggest that play has profound aesthetic, ethical, and epistemological dimensions while we blur the lines between literature and philosophy, science and the arts, the serious and the absurd.....

CLSL GU4003 Central European Drama in the Twentieth Century. 3 points.

Focus will be on the often deceptive modernity of modern Central and East European theater and its reflection of the forces that shaped modern European society. It will be argued that the abstract, experimental drama of the twentieth-century avant-garde tradition seems less vital at the century's end than the mixed forms of Central and East European dramatists.

CLSS GU4028 In the Shadow of Empires: Literature of the South Slavs From Realism to Today. 3 points.

Readings and discussion of the most important works of the South Slavic writers from the second half of the 19th Century to the present,

CLCZ GU4030 Postwar Czech Literature [in English]. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

A survey of postwar Czech fiction and drama. Knowledge of Czech not necessary. Parallel reading lists available in translation and in the original.

Fall 2017: CLCZ GU4030
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLCZ 4030 001/15375 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 3 4/18

CLRS GU4037 The Russian American Experience. 3 points.

In recent decades, Russian immigrant identity has changed. Immigrants and children of immigrants are much more involved with their home country. Fiction by Russian-speaking writers shows and also establishes relationship to geographies of their birth, usually Soviet successor nations such as Russia. The focus of this class is an analysis of works by Russian-speaking writers, filmmakers, and artists who create and also trace deepening forms of dialogue between the former Soviet Republics and North America.

Fall 2017: CLRS GU4037
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLRS 4037 001/88014 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
1201 International Affairs Bldg
Anna Katsnelson 3 4/25

CLRS GU4036 Nabokov and Global Culture. 3 points.

In 1955, an American writer of Russian descent published in Paris a thin book that forever shaped English language, American culture, and the international literary scene.  That book, of course, was Vladimir Nabokov'sLolita.


We will speak of exile, memory and nostalgia, of hybrid cultural identities and cosmopolitan elites, of language, translation and multilingualism.  All readings will be in English.

CLSL GU4075 Soviet and Post-Soviet, Colonial and Post Colonial Film. 3 points.

The course will discuss how filmmaking has been used as an instrument of power and imperial domination in the Soviet Union as well as on post-Soviet space since 1991. A body of selected films by Soviet and post-Soviet directors which exemplify the function of filmmaking as a tool of appropriation of the colonized, their cultural and political subordination by the Soviet center will be examined in terms of postcolonial theories. The course will focus both on Russian cinema and often overlooked work of Ukrainian, Georgian, Belarusian, Armenian, etc. national film schools and how they participated in the communist project of fostering a «new historic community of the Soviet people» as well as resisted it by generating, in hidden and, since 1991, overt and increasingly assertive ways their own counter-narratives. Close attention will be paid to the new Russian film as it re-invents itself within the post-Soviet imperial momentum projected on the former Soviet colonies.

Fall 2017: CLSL GU4075
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLSL 4075 001/61953 T 6:10pm - 10:00pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Yuri Shevchuk 3 8/18

RUSS GU4350 Moving to Advanced-Plus: Language, Culture, Society in Russian Today. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Six semesters of college Russian and the instructor’s permission.

The course is designed to provide advanced and highly-motivated undergraduate and graduate students of various majors with an opportunity to develop professional vocabulary and discourse devices that will help them to discuss their professional fields in Russian with fluency and accuracy. The course targets all four language competencies: speaking, listening, reading and writing, as well as cultural understanding. Conducted in Russian.

Fall 2017: RUSS GU4350
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4350 001/26623 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Alla Smyslova 3 8/15

Russian Literature and Culture (in Russian)

RUSS GU4344 Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Advanced Russian Through History. 3 points.

Prerequisites: three years of college Russian or the equivalent.

A language course designed to meet the needs of those foreign learners of Russian as well as heritage speakers who want to develop further their reading, speaking, and writing skills and be introduced to the history of Russia.

Fall 2017: RUSS GU4344
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4344 001/22945 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
207 Milbank Hall
Vasily Lvov 3 8/15

RUSS UN3333 Vvedenie v russkuiu literaturu: Poor Liza, Poor Olga, Poor Me. 3 points.

For non-native speakers of Russian.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: two years of college Russian or the instructor's permission.

The course is devoted to the reading, analysis, and discussion of a number of Russian prose fiction works from the eighteenth to twentieth century. Its purpose is to give students an opportunity to apply their language skills to literature. It will teach students to read Russian literary texts as well as to talk and write about them. Its goal is, thus, twofold: to improve the students’ linguistic skills and to introduce them to Russian literature and literary history. In 2007-2008: A close study in the original of the “fallen woman” plot in Russian literature from the late eighteenth century. Conducted in Russian.

Fall 2017: RUSS UN3333
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 3333 001/24208 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
411 Hamilton Hall
Irina Reyfman 3 9/18

Czech Language and Literature

CZCH UN1201 Intermediate Czech I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CZCH W1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar. Readings in contemporary fiction and nonfiction, depending upon the interests of individual students. This course number is being changed to CZCH 2101

CZCH GU4333 Readings in Czech Literature, I. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: two years of college Czech or the equivalent.

A close study in the original of representative works of Czech literature. Discussion and writing assignments in Czech aimed at developing advanced language proficiency.

Fall 2017: CZCH GU4333
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 4333 001/10823 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 3 0/12

CZCH GU4334 Readings in Czech Literature, II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: two years of college Czech or the equivalent.

A close study in the original of representative works of Czech literature. Discussion and writing assignments in Czech aimed at developing advanced language proficiency.

Spring 2018: CZCH GU4334
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 4334 001/71004 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Christopher Harwood 3 0/12

CZCH UN1101 Elementary Czech I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepare students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2017: CZCH UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 1101 001/70275 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
353b International Affairs Bldg
Christopher Harwood 4 2/12
CZCH 1101 001/70275 W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Christopher Harwood 4 2/12

CZCH UN1102 Elementary Czech II. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepare students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Spring 2018: CZCH UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 1102 001/26192 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
406 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 4 1/12

CZCH UN2101 Intermediate Czech I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CZCH UN1102 or the equivalent

Rapid review of grammar. Readings in contemporary fiction and nonfiction, depending upon the interests of individual students.

Fall 2017: CZCH UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CZCH 2101 001/12417 W 11:00am - 12:15pm
716a Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 4 2/12
CZCH 2101 001/12417 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Harwood 4 2/12

CZCH UN2102 Intermediate Czech II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: CZCH UN1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar. Readings in contemporary fiction and nonfiction, depending upon the interests of individual students.

Polish Language and Literature

POLI UN1201 Intermediate Polish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLI W1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar; readings in contemporary nonfiction or fiction, depending on the interests of individual students. This course number is being changed to POLI 2101

POLI UN1101 Elementary Polish I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2017: POLI UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 1101 001/23502 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Caes 4 9/12

POLI UN1102 Elementary Polish II. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Spring 2018: POLI UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 1102 001/70230 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
401 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Caes 4 7/12

POLI UN2101 Intermediate Polish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLI UN1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar; readings in contemporary nonfiction or fiction, depending on the interests of individual students.

Fall 2017: POLI UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 2101 001/62997 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
408 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Caes 4 6/12

POLI UN2102 Intermediate Polish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLI UN1102 or the equivalent.

Rapid review of grammar; readings in contemporary nonfiction or fiction, depending on the interests of individual students.

POLI GU4101 Advanced Polish I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: two years of college Polish or the instructor's permission.

Extensive readings from 19th- and 20th-century texts in the original. Both fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis depending on the interests and needs of individual students.

Fall 2017: POLI GU4101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 4101 001/10750 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
716a Hamilton Hall
Christopher Caes 4 1/12

POLI GU4102 Advanced Polish II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: two years of college Polish or the instructor's permission.

Extensive readings from 19th- and 20th-century texts in the original. Both fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis depending on the interests and needs of individual students.

Spring 2018: POLI GU4102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLI 4102 001/60391 M W F 2:40pm - 3:55pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Christopher Caes 4 0/12

Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian Language and Literature

BCRS UN1201 Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS W1102 or the equivalent.

Readings in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian literature in the original, with emphasis depending upon the needs of individual students. This course number is being changed to BCRS 2101

BCRS UN1101 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Fall 2017: BCRS UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 1101 001/61317 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
352c International Affairs Bldg
Milica Ilicic 4 5/12

BCRS UN1102 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 4 points.

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

Spring 2018: BCRS UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 1102 001/10143 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Milica Ilicic 4 3/12

BCRS UN2101 Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS UN1102 or the equivalent.

Readings in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian literature in the original, with emphasis depending upon the needs of individual students.

Fall 2017: BCRS UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 2101 001/22615 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
352c International Affairs Bldg
Aleksandar Boskovic 3 8/12

BCRS UN2102 Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS UN1102 or the equivalent.

Readings in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian literature in the original, with emphasis depending upon the needs of individual students. This course number has been changed to BCRS 2102

Spring 2018: BCRS UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 2102 001/60951 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Aleksandar Boskovic 3 6/12

BCRS GU4331 Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS UN2102

Further develops skills in speaking, reading, and writing, using essays, short stories, films, and fragments of larger works. Reinforces basic grammar and introduces more complete structures.

Fall 2017: BCRS GU4331
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 4331 001/75054 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
352c International Affairs Bldg
Aleksandar Boskovic 3 2/12

BCRS GU4332 Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BCRS UN2102

Further develops skills in speaking, reading, and writing, using essays, short stories, films, and fragments of larger works. Reinforces basic grammar and introduces more complete structures.

Spring 2018: BCRS GU4332
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BCRS 4332 001/14135 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Aleksandar Boskovic 3 1/12

Ukrainian Language and Literature

UKRN UN1101 Elementary Ukrainian I. 3 points.

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

Fall 2017: UKRN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 1101 001/13786 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
Room TBA
Yuri Shevchuk 3 1/12

UKRN UN1102 Elementary Ukrainian II. 3 points.

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

Spring 2018: UKRN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 1102 001/24861 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Yuri Shevchuk 3 0/12

UKRN UN2101 Intermediate Ukrainian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: UKRN UN1102 or the equivalent.

Reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of grammar and a core vocabulary from daily life. Principal emphasis is placed on further development of communicative skills (oral and written). Verbal aspect and verbs of motion receive special attention.

Fall 2017: UKRN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 2101 001/67418 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Yuri Shevchuk 3 2/12
UKRN 2101 001/67418 Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Yuri Shevchuk 3 2/12

UKRN UN2102 Intermediate Ukrainian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: UKRN UN1102 or the equivalent.

Reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of grammar and a core vocabulary from daily life. Principal emphasis is placed on further development of communicative skills (oral and written). Verbal aspect and verbs of motion receive special attention.

Spring 2018: UKRN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 2102 001/69052 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
716a Hamilton Hall
Yuri Shevchuk 3 1/12

UKRN UN4001 Advanced Ukrainian I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: UKRN W2102 or the equivalent.

The course is for students who wish to develop their mastery of Ukrainian. Further study of grammar includes patterns of word formation, participles, gerunds, declension of numerals, and a more in-depth study of difficult subjects, such as verbal aspect and verbs of motion. The material is drawn from classical and contemporary Ukrainian literature, press, electronic media, and film. Taught almost exclusively in Ukrainian.

Fall 2017: UKRN UN4001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 4001 001/73424 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Yuri Shevchuk 3 0/12

UKRN GU4002 Advanced Ukrainian II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: UKRN UN2102 or the equivalent.

The course is for students who wish to develop their mastery of Ukrainian. Further study of grammar includes patterns of word formation, participles, gerunds, declension of numerals, and a more in-depth study of difficult subjects, such as verbal aspect and verbs of motion. The material is drawn from classical and contemporary Ukrainian literature, press, electronic media, and film. Taught almost exclusively in Ukrainian.

Spring 2018: UKRN GU4002
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
UKRN 4002 001/65719 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
716a Hamilton Hall
Yuri Shevchuk 3 0/12

Hungarian

HNGR UN3343 Hungarian Descriptive Grammar. 3 points.

This course is designed for those curious about the structure of Hungarian - an unusual language with a complex grammar quite different from English, or, indeed, any Indo -European language. The study of Hungarian, a language of the Finno-Ugric family, offers the opportunity to learn about the phonology of vowel harmony, the syntax of topic-comment discourse, verb agreement with subjects and objects, highly developed case systems and possessive nominal paradigms. In addition to its inflectional profile, Hungarian derivation possibilities are vast, combinatory, and playful. During the semester we will touch upon all the important grammatical aspects of Hungarian and discuss them in relation to general linguistic principles and discourse, and finally, through some text analysis, see them in action. Although the primary discussion will center on Hungarian, we will draw on comparisons to other Finno-Ugric languages, most notably Finnish and Komi; students are encouraged to draw on comparisons with their own languages of interest. No prerequisite. Counts as Core Linguistics.

Spring 2018: HNGR UN3343
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 3343 001/29908 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Room TBA
Carol Rounds 3 7/18

HNGR UN1101 Elementary Hungarian I. 4 points.

Introduction to the basic structures of the Hungarian language. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

Fall 2017: HNGR UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 1101 001/77372 T Th 9:10am - 11:00am
501 Hamilton Hall
Carol Rounds 4 2/20

HNGR UN1102 Elementary Hungarian II. 4 points.

Introduction to the basic structures of the Hungarian language. With the instructor's permission the second term of this course may be taken without the first. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

Spring 2018: HNGR UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 1102 001/69442 T Th 9:10am - 11:00am
Room TBA
Carol Rounds 4 1/20

HNGR UN1201 Intermediate Hungarian I. 4 points.

Further develops a student's knowledge of the Hungarian language. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

Fall 2017: HNGR UN1201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 1201 001/18235 Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
351a International Affairs Bldg
Carol Rounds 4 3/16
HNGR 1201 001/18235 T 3:30pm - 5:20pm
351a International Affairs Bldg
Carol Rounds 4 3/16

HNGR UN2102 Intermediate Hungarian II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: HNGR W1101-W1102 or the equivalent.

Further develops a student's knowledge of the Hungarian language. With the instructor's permission the second term of this course may be taken without the first. Students with a schedule conflict should consult the instructor about the possibility of adjusting hours.

Spring 2018: HNGR UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 2102 001/24416 T Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Room TBA
Carol Rounds, Stephane Charitos 4 0/18

HNGR GU4028 Modern Hungarian Prose in Translation: Exposing Naked Reality. 3 points.

This course introduces students to representative examples of an essentially robust, reality-bound, socially aware literature. In modern Hungarian prose fiction, the tradition of nineteenth-century "anecdotal realism" remained strong and was further enlivened by various forms of naturalism. Even turn-of-the century and early twentieth-century modernist fiction is characterized by strong narrative focus, psychological realism, and an emphasis on social conditions and local color. During the tumultuous decades of the century, social, political, national issues preoccupied even aesthetics-conscious experimenters and ivory-tower dwellers. Among the topics discussed will be "populist" and "urban" literature in the interwar years, post-1945 reality in fiction, literary memoirs and reportage, as well as late-century minimalist and postmodern trends.

Fall 2017: HNGR GU4028
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HNGR 4028 001/19782 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Ivan Sanders 3 4/12

Linguistics

Comparative Literature Slavic

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