Classics and Ancient Studies

http://classics.barnard.edu

216 Milbank Hall
212-854-2852
212-854-7491 (fax)
Department Assistant: Tynisha Rue

Greek and Roman Language, Literature, and Culture; Ancient Studies; Modern Greek

Department of Classics and Ancient Studies (see below for Modern Greek)

Mission

The department of Classics and Ancient Studies aims to introduce students to a knowledge of the languages and an understanding of the literature and culture of ancient Greece and Rome in a broader Mediterranean context, as well as to develop an appreciation of how Greco-Roman antiquity has been used and abused by later eras. The study of the languages enables access to a wide range of challenging and influential ancient texts, artifacts, and ideas and also makes the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of English and other modern languages more comprehensible. The study of these texts, in turn, develops analytical and critical thinking about both the past and the present, the ability to assess many different kinds of fragmentary evidence, as well as skills in writing, close reading and oral presentation, cultural awareness, and literary sensibility. Close cooperation between Barnard and Columbia enables ancient studies students to plan and implement an integrated, cohesive interdisciplinary study of the ancient world, including language, literature, mythology, history, religion, philosophy, law, political theory, comparative literature, medieval studies, gender studies, art history and material culture. The texts and  monuments of the Greco-Roman world served as the basis of Western education until the twentieth-century and  retain a core position in modern humanities and social thought that is currently expanding beyond the West. Exploring, analyzing, and assessing this legacy is the central goal of the program.

Majors

The department offers two majors. The majors in Classics (Greek, Latin, or Classics) center on work in the original languages, whereas the major in Ancient Studies has an interdisciplinary focus. All members of the department are available for major advising and students ideally choose an adviser who can help them develop their required senior essays.

The Major in Classics (Greek), Classics (Latin) or Classics (Latin and Greek)

Classics majors develop a knowledge of Greek and Latin as a gateway to the study of the literature, history, and culture of Greece and Rome. Students can start Greek and Latin at Barnard or build on skills acquired in high school. Second year courses introduce students to original texts in Greek or Latin by authors such as Homer, Plato, Herodotus, or the Greek orators or Vergil, Ovid, Horace, Cicero, Caesar, Livy or Sallust. A range of advanced courses in Greek or Latin focus on prose or poetic texts drawn from ancient epic, lyric poetry, philosophy, drama, history, rhetoric or the novel and introduce critical approaches and literary and historical scholarship. Students are encouraged to take more courses in ancient history and classical literature and civilization than the two required for the major. Students planning to go on to graduate work in Classics and related fields are advised to undertake at least three years in both languages as well as to begin acquiring the ability to read scholarship in French, German, or Italian. Study abroad for one semester in either Greece or Rome is common and encouraged.

Student Learning Objectives in Classics

Students successfully completing a major in Classics should be able to attain the following objectives:

  • Translate a range of Greek or Latin texts at a moderately advanced level and demonstrate an understanding of the grammar and syntax of ancient languages.
  • Read, analyze, and write about ancient texts persuasively and locate texts in their historical and cultural contexts.
  • Achieve familiarity with the methodologies and critical approaches and research tools deployed in classical scholarship that will be demonstrated in the successful completion of a senior research project.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with the work of a variety of ancient writers, literary styles, genres, and periods and their later influences.

The Major in Ancient Studies

All students in the department are encouraged to take courses in history and classical civilization that require no knowledge of the languages. Students in the more fully interdisciplinary Ancient Studies major combine study of at least one ancient language with a range of courses in various departments focusing on language, literature, mythology, history, religion, philosophy, political theory, law, film, comparative literature, medieval studies, gender studies, art history and material culture. Each student develops a concentration in one geographical area or period, but is encouraged to focus on a set of related issues and questions. Ancient Studies students will encounter many disciplinary approaches and investigate Greek and Roman and related ancient cultures in Egypt and the Near East and their influences on later Western (and to the degree possible, non-Western) culture. From this perspective the major can complement work in other liberal arts majors. Study abroad for one semester in either Greece, Rome, Egypt, or the Near East is common and encouraged.

Student Learning Objectives in Ancient Studies

Students successfully completing a major in Classics should be able to attain the following objectives:

  • Read, analyze, and write about ancient texts persuasively and locate texts in their historical and cultural contexts.
  • Achieve familiarity with the methodologies and critical approaches and research tools deployed in classical scholarship and in related disciplines studied by each individual student that is demonstrated in the successful completion of a senior research project.
  • Achieve familiarity with the work of a variety of ancient writers on a range of interdisciplinary topics.
  • Engage in detail with the methods needed to analyze the range of fragmentary evidence, both written and material, required in an interdisciplinary study of the ancient Mediterranean world.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with one geographical area or period in the Greek, Latin or related ancient Mediterranean worlds.
  • Assess differences among and relations between ancient cultures and analyze the use and abuse of evidence about the ancient world by later cultures.

The Greek or Latin Play

The Classics Department is the beneficiary of the Matthew Alan Kramer Fund, whose principal purpose is to support the production of plays in Ancient Greek or Latin. Students of the department have produced Antigone, Medea, Alcestis, Persians, Eumenides, Cyclops, Electra, Clouds, Trojan Women, Rudens, Helen, Trachiniae, Bacchae, Hippolytus, Heracles, Birds, and Persa, which have provided an exciting and different learning experience for the participants.

Classics in New York

Every effort is made to introduce students to considerable resources for the study and influence of the Classics in New York City, including plays, films, and museum and gallery visits.

Careers Undertaken by Classics and Ancient Studies Majors

Our majors graduate well prepared for graduate careers in Classics and related academic fields such as history, philosophy, archaeology, art history or comparative literature. They also enter successful careers in secondary school teaching, museum work and arts administration, as well as law, medicine and biological sciences, business, politics, public service in both the government and non-profit sectors, journalism and creative writing, publishing, library science, and the arts (especially theater, film and dance).

Study Abroad

The following three programs are pre-approved, but students may discuss other options with their advisers.

ICCS in Rome

Barnard College participates in the program of the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. Majors in Classics or Ancient Studies are eligible to apply for admission to the program of the Rome Center for one semester, preferably in the junior year. Courses taken at the Rome Center may be used in the major and, in some cases, may be used to satisfy distribution requirements. The program provides undergraduate students with an opportunity to study ancient history and archaeology in Rome, Greek and Latin literature, and ancient and renaissance art. Students planning to apply to the ICCS should plan to take Roman history before applying and preference is given to those with two or more years of Latin and Greek. Applications for the spring term are due in mid-October and for the fall term in mid-March. Because of Sicily’s ancient connections to Greece, the program focuses more on the Hellenic culture of Magna Graeca and Sicily’s place as a cultural crossroads in the ancient Mediterranean. 

ICCS in Sicily

The focus of ICCS Sicily, as in the original program in Rome, will be on classical languages as well as on local manifestations of history and civilization in the ancient Mediterranean world. Based at the University of Catania, in a city with a rich ancient, medieval and Baroque history, this program offers extensive local academic resources and close proximity to both the mainland and other towns on the island. 

CYA: College Year In Athens

The College Year in Athens (CYA) program offers either one semester or a full year of courses in ancient and modern Greek languages, history, art, and archaeology, as well as advanced Latin and courses in post-classical and modern Greek culture, politics, and history. Almost 200 colleges participate in the CYA. Applications for the spring term must be received by mid-October and by mid-May for the fall term.

Summer Study

Students interested in summer programs in archaeology should consult the website of the American Institute for Archaeology (AIA) under fieldwork.

The CUNY Greek and Latin Workshops in midtown Manhattan offer special intensive summer language programs in Greek and Latin. Other institutions including Columbia offer summer language courses. The American Numismatics Society in Manhattan offers courses in the study of ancient coins.

Barnard College is a Supporting Institution of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the American Academy in Rome, and certain privileges of those schools are open without fee to graduates of the College.

Chair: Kristina Milnor (Professor)
Professors: Helene Foley, Nancy Worman
Assistant Professors: Joshua Fincher (Term), Ellen Morris

Other officers of the University offering courses in Classics:

Professors: Kathy H. Eden, Carmela Franklin, Deborah T. Steiner, Katharina Volk, Gareth D. Williams, James E. G. Zetzel
Associate Professor: Karen Van Dyck (Modern Greek)
Assistant Professors: Vangelis Calotychos (Modern Greek), Marcus Folch, Joseph Howley, Elizabeth Irwin
Lecturer: Elizabeth Scharffenberger

Requirements for the Majors in Classics and Ancient Studies

Fulfilling the Foreign Language requirement

Students may fulfill the foreign language requirement in Greek by completing GREK UN1202 , or in Latin by completing LATN UN1202 , or by completing one course in Greek or Latin at the 3000 level or above. In rare instances, the language requirement may be fulfilled by passing an exemption examination with a sufficiently high grade. This examination tests the student's knowledge of grammar and her ability to translate written Greek or Latin.

Major in Classics

Greek

The major in Greek is fulfilled by taking the following courses as well as five other courses above the elementary level in Ancient Greek.

GREK UN3996The Major Seminar
GREK GU4105History of Greek Literature I
GREK GU4106History of Greek Literature II
GREK GU4139

Latin

The major in Latin is fulfilled by taking one term of the following courses, as well as five other courses in Latin. 

LATN UN3996The Major Seminar
LATN GU4105Latin Literature of the Republic
LATN GU4106Latin Literature of the Empire
LATN GU4139Elements of Prose Style

Students planning to go on to graduate study in classics are strongly urged to take both semesters of GREK GU4105 History of Greek Literature I, GREK GU4106 History of Greek Literature II or LATN GU4105 Latin Literature of the Republic, LATN GU4106 Latin Literature of the Empire. Majors in Latin, especially those who have begun their study in high school, are strongly advised to take at least two semesters of Greek.

In addition, one semester of ancient history appropriate to the major and two relevant courses in ancient art, classical civilization or literature, ancient philosophy, or religion are required for either the Greek or the Latin major. Students who do not opt to take a term of either GREK GU4105 History of Greek Literature I-GREK GU4106 History of Greek Literature II or LATN GU4105 Latin Literature of the Republic-LATN GU4106 Latin Literature of the Empire are required to take CLLT GU4300 The Classical Tradition, as one of their three required courses in translation.

A student may elect to major in both Greek and Latin (Classics) by completing the major requirements in one language and five courses above the elementary level in the other.

Major in Ancient Studies

Each student, after consultation with the Barnard Chair, chooses an advisor whose field is closely related to her own and with whom she will plan her senior essay.

A total of 36 points are required in the major, including at least four courses in one geographical area or period; courses in at least three departments to ensure proper interdisciplinary training and expertise; the elementary sequence of a relevant ancient language; the appropriate history course; ANCS V3995 The Major Seminar, and at least the first semester of Ancient Studies ANCS UN3998 Directed Research In Ancient Studies, ANCS V3999 Directed Research in Ancient Studies (senior essay). Ancient language courses may be used toward the major requirement; however, where a second ancient language is offered, one second-year sequence must be offered for a student to gain credit for the first year. As noted above, an annual list of the courses meeting the requirements for Ancient Studies in any particular year appears separately on the website.

Requirements for the Minors in Classics, Modern Greek, and Ancient Studies

Minor in Greek

The minor in Greek requires five courses in Greek at the 1200 level or above.

Minor in Latin

The minor in Latin requires five courses in Latin at the 1200 level or above.

Minor in Modern Greek

The Minor in Modern Greek requires five courses in Modern Greek at the 1200 level or above.  Modern Greek courses are taught entirely at Columbia.

Minor in Ancient Studies

The minor in Ancient Studies requires five courses that focus on the ancient Mediterranean world.  At least one course in ancient Mediterranean history is required. Interested students should consult the department and the Classics and Ancient Studies website on selecting a complimentary and coherent set of courses for this minor.

Ancient Studies

ANCS UN3997 Directed Readings In Ancient Studies. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies' permission.

Program of readings in some aspect of ancient studies, supervised by an appropriate faculty member chosen from the departments offering courses in the program in Ancient Studies. Evaluation by a series of essays, one long paper, or oral or written examination(s). 

Fall 2017: ANCS UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANCS 3997 001/20227  
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 3 0
ANCS 3997 002/27657  
Seth Schwartz 3 0
ANCS 3997 003/66081  
Deborah Steiner 3 0
ANCS 3997 004/76878  
Marcus Folch 3 0
ANCS 3997 005/65045  
Carmela Franklin 3 0
ANCS 3997 006/27316  
Paraskevi Martzavou 3 0
ANCS 3997 007/77688  
Katharina Volk 3 0
ANCS 3997 008/12168  
Kathy Eden 3 0
ANCS 3997 009/16238  
Caitlin Gillespie 3 0
ANCS 3997 010/04002  
Helene Foley 3 0
ANCS 3997 011/01665  
Ellen Morris 3 0
ANCS 3997 012/00744  
Nancy Worman 3 0
ANCS 3997 013/02641  
Kristina Milnor 3 0
Spring 2018: ANCS UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANCS 3997 001/18625  
Katharina Volk 3 0
ANCS 3997 002/02672  
Caitlin Gillespie 3 0
ANCS 3997 003/10313  
Darcy Krasne 3 0
ANCS 3997 004/69558  
Paraskevi Martzavou 3 0/12
ANCS 3997 005/68191  
Carmela Franklin 3 0
ANCS 3997 006/11073  
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 3 0
ANCS 3997 007/61364  
Seth Schwartz 3 0/50
ANCS 3997 008/22147  
Marcus Folch 3 0
ANCS 3997 009/71819  
Gareth Williams 3 0
ANCS 3997 013/01398  
Kristina Milnor 3 0

ANCS UN3998 Directed Research In Ancient Studies. 3 points.

Required for all Ancient Studies majors.

Program of research in ancient studies under the direction of an advisor associated with the program, resulting in a research paper. Outline and bibliography must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies before credit will be awarded for ANCS V3995.

Fall 2017: ANCS UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANCS 3998 001/76806  
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 3 0
ANCS 3998 002/10052  
Seth Schwartz 3 0
ANCS 3998 003/76596  
Deborah Steiner 3 0
ANCS 3998 004/62640  
Marcus Folch 3 0
ANCS 3998 005/70231  
Carmela Franklin 3 0
ANCS 3998 006/22562  
Paraskevi Martzavou 3 0
ANCS 3998 007/20570  
Katharina Volk 3 0
ANCS 3998 008/62951  
Kathy Eden 3 0
ANCS 3998 009/11141  
Caitlin Gillespie 3 0
ANCS 3998 010/01372  
Helene Foley 3 0
ANCS 3998 011/08346  
Ellen Morris 3 0
ANCS 3998 012/03261  
Nancy Worman 3 0
ANCS 3998 013/08283  
Kristina Milnor 3 0
Spring 2018: ANCS UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANCS 3998 001/10801  
Katharina Volk 3 0
ANCS 3998 002/06329  
Caitlin Gillespie 3 0
ANCS 3998 003/20146  
Darcy Krasne 3 0
ANCS 3998 004/21815  
Paraskevi Martzavou 3 0/50
ANCS 3998 005/72988  
Carmela Franklin 3 0
ANCS 3998 006/23451  
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 3 0
ANCS 3998 007/61444  
Seth Schwartz 3 0
ANCS 3998 008/67726  
Marcus Folch 3 0
ANCS 3998 009/25888  
Gareth Williams 3 1
ANCS 3998 013/07939  
Kristina Milnor 3 0

Classics

CLCV UN3059 WORLDS OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

This course looks at the narrative and the historical context for an extraordinary event: the conquest of the Persian empire by Alexander III of Macedonia, conventionally known as “Alexander the Great”. We will explore the different worlds Alexander grew out of, confronted, and affected: the old Greek world, the Persian empire, the ancient near-east (Egypt, Levant, Babylonia, Iran), and the worlds beyond, namely pre-Islamic (and pre-Silk Road) Central Asia, the Afghan borderlands, and the Indus valley. The first part of the course will establish context, before laying out a narrative framework; the second part of the course will explore a series of themes, especially the tension between military conquest, political negotiation, and social interactions. Overall, the course will serve as an exercise in historical methodology (with particular attention to ancient sources and to interpretation), an introduction to the geography and the history of the ancient world (classical and near-eastern), and the exploration of a complex testcase located at the contact point between several worlds, and at a watershed of world history. There will be two weekly lectures and one weekly discussion section. 

CLLT UN3125 Book Histories and the Classics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: HUMA CC1001 or HUMA GS1001COCI CC1101 ,HUMA CC1001 or HUMA GS1001 or COCI CC1101

This seminar will introduce students of classical literature to the history of the Western book, and to the relationship between book history and the transmission and reception history of the literature of ancient Greece and Rome.  Students will also learn how to make use of rare books materials including manuscripts and early printed books......

CLLT UN3132 Classical Myth. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Survey of major myths from the ancient Near East to the advent of Christianity, with emphasis upon the content and treatment of myths in classical authors (Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Euripides, Sophocles, Vergil, Livy, Ovid).

Fall 2017: CLLT UN3132
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLLT 3132 001/06333 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
323 Milbank Hall
Helene Foley 3 34/70

CLLT GU4300 The Classical Tradition. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

Overview of Greek and Roman literature. Close analysis of selected texts from the major genres accompanied by lectures on literary history. Topics include the context out of which the genres arose, the suitability of various modern critical approaches to the ancient texts, the problem of translation, and the transmission of the classical authors and their influence on modern literature.

Fall 2017: CLLT GU4300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLLT 4300 001/05641 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
424 Kent Hall
Darcy Krasne 3 6/30

 Greek

GREK UN1101 Elementary Greek I. 4 points.

For students who have never studied Greek. An intensive study of grammar with reading and writing of simple Attic prose.

Fall 2017: GREK UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1101 001/60939 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Paraskevi Martzavou 4 7/18
GREK 1101 002/65967 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Heintges 4 11/18
Spring 2018: GREK UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1101 001/76750 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Gareth Williams 4 6/18

GREK UN1102 Elementary Greek II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: GREK V1101 or the equivalent, or the instructor or the director of undergraduate studies' permission.

Continuation of grammar study begun in GREK V1101; selections from Attic prose.

Fall 2017: GREK UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1102 001/66730 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Maria Dimitropoulos 4 2/18
Spring 2018: GREK UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1102 001/16831 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
408 Hamilton Hall
Paraskevi Martzavou 4 0/18
GREK 1102 002/12285 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Heintges 4 11/18

GREK UN1121 Intensive Elementary Greek. 4 points.

Covers all of Greek grammar and syntax in one term. Prepares the student to enter second-year Greek (GREK V1201 or V1202).

Fall 2017: GREK UN1121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1121 001/23147 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Stephanie Melvin 4 11/18
Spring 2018: GREK UN1121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1121 001/21309 T Th F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
406 Hamilton Hall
Carina de Klerk 4 4/18

GREK UN2101 Intermediate Greek I Attic Prose. 4 points.

Prerequisites: GREK V1101-1102 or the equivalent.

Selections from Attic prose.

Fall 2017: GREK UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 2101 001/73500 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Jesse James 4 6/18
Spring 2018: GREK UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 2101 001/26170 M W F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Darcy Krasne 4 8/18

GREK UN3309 Imperial Prose. 3 points.

Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Fall 2017: GREK UN3309
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3309 001/07460 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
327 Milbank Hall
Helene Foley 3 8

GREK UN2102 Intermediate Greek II: Homer. 4 points.

Prerequisites: GREK V1101-V1102 or GREK V1121 or the equivalent.

Detailed grammatical and literary study of several books of the Iliad and introduction to the techniques or oral poetry, to the Homeric hexameter, and to the historical background of Homer.

Fall 2017: GREK UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 2102 001/93047 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
617b Hamilton Hall
Deborah Steiner 4 13/18
Spring 2018: GREK UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 2102 001/22519 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
607 Hamilton Hall
Caitlin Gillespie 4 7

GREK UN3310 Selections from Greek Literature II: Homer & Hesiod. 3 points.

Prerequisites: GREK V1201-V1202 or the equivalent.

Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Spring 2018: GREK UN3310
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3310 001/10558 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
Room TBA
Marcus Folch 3 7/25

GREK UN3996 The Major Seminar. 3 points.

Prerequisites: junior standing.

Required for all majors in classics and classical studies. The topic changes from year to year, but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major. Past topics include: love, dining, slavery, space, power.

Fall 2017: GREK UN3996
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3996 001/68378 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
617b Hamilton Hall
Marcus Folch 3 3/20

GREK UN3997 Directed Readings. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies' permission.

A program of reading in Greek literature, to be tested by a series of short papers, one long paper, or an oral or written examination.

Fall 2017: GREK UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3997 001/72869  
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 3 0
GREK 3997 002/29598  
Seth Schwartz 3 0
GREK 3997 003/28166  
Deborah Steiner 3 0
GREK 3997 004/73216  
Marcus Folch 3 0
GREK 3997 005/74983  
Paraskevi Martzavou 3 1
GREK 3997 006/04456  
Helene Foley 3 0
GREK 3997 007/04700  
Nancy Worman 3 0
GREK 3997 008/07842  
Ellen Morris 3 0
Spring 2018: GREK UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3997 001/70788  
Marcus Folch 3 0
GREK 3997 003/21704  
Paraskevi Martzavou 3 0
GREK 3997 004/18737  
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 3 0
GREK 3997 005/73856  
Seth Schwartz 3 0
GREK 3997 006/05419  
Ellen Morris 3 0
GREK 3997 013/09443  
Helene Foley 3 0

GREK UN3998 Supervised Research. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies' permission.

A program of research in Greek literature. Research paper required.

Fall 2017: GREK UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3998 001/23131  
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 3 0
GREK 3998 002/71341  
Seth Schwartz 3 0
GREK 3998 003/72302  
Paraskevi Martzavou 3 0
GREK 3998 004/10251  
Deborah Steiner 3 0
GREK 3998 005/12762  
Marcus Folch 3 0
GREK 3998 006/01118  
Helene Foley 3 0
GREK 3998 007/05966  
Nancy Worman 3 0
GREK 3998 008/01683  
Ellen Morris 3 0
Spring 2018: GREK UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3998 001/19775  
Marcus Folch 3 0
GREK 3998 003/20631  
Paraskevi Martzavou 3 0/30
GREK 3998 004/26376  
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 3 0
GREK 3998 005/27579  
Seth Schwartz 3 0
GREK 3998 006/07260  
Ellen Morris 3 1
GREK 3998 013/05025  
Helene Foley 3 1
GREK 3998 014/02571  
Nancy Worman 3 0

GREK GU4009 Sophocles & Aristophanes. 3 points.

Prerequisites: GREK V1201 and V1202, or their equivalent.

Since the content of the course changes from year to year, it may be taken in consecutive years.

Fall 2017: GREK GU4009
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 4009 001/15300 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
707 Hamilton Hall
Marcus Folch 3 8/20

GREK GU4010 Selections from Greek Literature: Thucydides. 3 points.

Prerequisites: GREK V1201-V1202 or the equivalent.

Since the content of this course changes each year, it may be repeated for credit.

Spring 2018: GREK GU4010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 4010 001/05564  
Nancy Worman 3 5/15

GREK GU4105 History of Greek Literature I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least two terms of Greek at the 3000-level or higher.

Readings in Greek literature from Homer to the 4th century B.C.

Fall 2017: GREK GU4105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 4105 001/72904 T Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
617b Hamilton Hall
Deborah Steiner 4 10/15

GREK GU4106 History of Greek Literature II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least two terms of Greek at the 3000-level or higher.

Greek literature of the 4th century B.C. and of the Hellenistic and Imperial Ages.

Spring 2018: GREK GU4106
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 4106 001/11695 T Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
617b Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 4 5/20

GREK UN3980 The Post-Baccalaureate Seminar. 3 points.

Open only to students enrolled in the post-baccalaureate certificate program in Classics.

This seminar aims to provide students in the post-baccalaureate certificate program with opportunities 1) to (re-)familiarize themselves with a selection of major texts from classical antiquity, which will be read in English, 2) to become acquainted with scholarship on these texts and with scholarly writing in general, 3) to write analytically about these texts and the interpretations posed about them in contemporary scholarship, and 4) to read in the original language selected passages of one of the texts in small tutorial groups, which will meet every week for an additional hour with members of the faculty.

Fall 2017: GREK UN3980
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 3980 001/14636 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 3 3/15

Latin

LATN UN1101 Elementary Latin I. 4 points.

For students who have never studied Latin. An intensive study of grammar with reading of simple prose and poetry.

Fall 2017: LATN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1101 001/19945 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
616 Hamilton Hall
Caleb Simone 4 13/18
LATN 1101 002/23245 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Tal Ardon Ish Shalom 4 12/18
Spring 2018: LATN UN1101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1101 001/15050 T Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
607 Hamilton Hall
Alice Sharpless 4 13/18

LATN UN1102 Elementary Latin II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN1101.

A continuation of LATN UN1101, including a review of grammar and syntax for students whose study of Latin has been interrupted.

Fall 2017: LATN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1102 001/75011 T Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
613 Hamilton Hall
Carina de Klerk 4 6/18
Spring 2018: LATN UN1102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1102 001/28764 M W F 8:40am - 9:55am
607 Hamilton Hall
Caleb Simone 4 12/18
LATN 1102 002/75041 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Mariana Noe 4 5/18

LATN UN1121 Intensive Elementary Latin. 4 points.

Designed to cover all of Latin grammar and syntax in one semester in order to prepare the student to enter LATN UN2101 or un2102.

Fall 2017: LATN UN1121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1121 001/29919 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Kate Brassel 4 14/18

LATN UN3012 Augustan Poetry. 3 points.

Prerequisites: LATN V1202 or the equivalent.

Selections from Vergil and Horace. Combines literary analysis with work in grammar and metrics.

Fall 2017: LATN UN3012
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3012 001/70940 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
834 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Darcy Krasne 3 20/30

LATN UN2101 Intermediate Latin I. 4 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN1101-UN1102, or LATN UN1121, or the equivalent.

Selections from Catullus and from Cicero or Caesar.

Fall 2017: LATN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 2101 001/21699 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
616 Hamilton Hall
Carmela Franklin 4 13/18
LATN 2101 002/11649 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Deborah Sokolowski 4 16/18
Spring 2018: LATN UN2101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 2101 001/10709 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Tristan Power 4 13/18

LATN UN2102 Intermediate Latin II. 4 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN2101 or the equivalent.

Selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses and from Sallust, Livy, Seneca, or Pliny.

Fall 2017: LATN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 2102 003/82550 T Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
616 Hamilton Hall
Tristan Power 4 10/18
Spring 2018: LATN UN2102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 2102 001/07304 T Th F 10:10am - 11:25am
118 Barnard Hall
Kristina Milnor 4 11/18
LATN 2102 002/28082 M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
607 Hamilton Hall
4 18/18

LATN UN3033 Medieval Language and Literature. 3 points.

Prerequisites: four semesters of college Latin or the instructor's permission.

This survey focuses on translation, grammatical analysis, and discussion of the literary and cultural contexts of medieval Latin prose and poetry. It includes widely read texts by major authors (e.g. Augustin, Boethius, Abelard and Heloise, Bernard of Clairvaux, Petrarch) as well as lesser-known anonymous pieces (e.g. love lyric from the Cambridge Songs and the Carmina Burana, poetic satire from a rotulus, and a novel, the Historia Apollonii).

Fall 2017: LATN UN3033
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3033 001/74193 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
509 Hamilton Hall
Carmela Franklin 3 9/20

LATN UN3035 Poetry as Neurosis: Lucan’s Bellum Civile. 3 points.

This course is an intensive study of Lucan’s revolutionary and enigmatic Bellum Civile, the epic masterpiece of the Neronian age, which was admired and imitated all through the history of Western culture by authors such as Dante, Montaigne, Milton, Voltaire, Goethe, Shelley, and Baudelaire among others. The course will examine major controversies concerning the form and meaning of the poem, with special emphasis on the poetic tension created by the narrator’s neurotic personality. The narration of the 49 BCE civil war between Caesar and Pompey is for Lucan the pretext for an original and intensely personal reflection on themes such as political oppression, the role of the individual in society, nihilism, self-destructiveness, mental disorder, and artistic creation. The poem will be analyzed from various critical perspectives that include rhetoric, intertextuality, deconstruction, reception theory, and psychoanalysis; no previous knowledge of any of these methodologies is required. Although an acceptable knowledge of Latin (intermediate or above) is assumed, the primary focus of this course is literary and sociological interpretation rather than linguistic competence. In addition to the Latin reading assignments, the poem will also be read entirely in English translation, allowing students to comprehend the whole while they engage with particular sections in the original language. The assignment for each class will include: (1) approximately five hundred lines to be read in English translation; (2) translation of short Latin passages, whose size may be adapted to the level of the class/student; (3) secondary readings.

LATN UN3309 LATIN LITERATURE SELECTIONS. 3 points.

Prerequisites: LATN V1202 or the equivalent.

Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Fall 2017: LATN UN3309
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3309 001/26711 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
613 Hamilton Hall
Darcy Krasne 3 10/20

LATN UN3310 Selections from Latin Literature: Roman Britain. 3 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN2102 or the equivalent.

Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Spring 2018: LATN UN3310
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3310 001/62849 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
Caitlin Gillespie 3 8/25

LATN UN3980 Post-Baccalaureate Seminar. 3 points.

Open only to students enrolled in the post-baccalaureate certificate program in Classics.

This seminar aims to provide students in the post-baccalaureate certificate program with opportunities 1) to (re-)familiarize themselves with a selection of major texts from classical antiquity, which will be read in English, 2) to become acquainted with scholarship on these texts and with scholarly writing in general, 3) to write analytically about these texts and the interpretations posed about them in contemporary scholarship, and 4) to read in the original language selected passages of one of the texts in small tutorial groups, which will meet every week for an additional hour with members of the faculty.

Fall 2017: LATN UN3980
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3980 001/15723 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
707 Hamilton Hall
Elizabeth Scharffenberger 3 5/15

LATN UN3996 The Major Seminar. 3 points.

Prerequisites: junior standing.

Required for all majors in Classics and Classical Studies. The topic changes from year to year but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major. Past topics include: love, dining, slavery, space, power.

Fall 2017: LATN UN3996
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3996 001/28281 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
617b Hamilton Hall
Marcus Folch 3 10/20

LATN UN3997 Directed Readings in Latin Literature. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies' permission.

A program of reading in Latin literature, to be tested by a series of short papers, one long paper, or an oral or written examination.

Fall 2017: LATN UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3997 001/11509  
Carmela Franklin 3 1
LATN 3997 002/61687  
Kathy Eden 3 0
LATN 3997 003/15673  
Katharina Volk 3 1
LATN 3997 004/07235  
Ellen Morris 3 0
LATN 3997 005/01887  
Kristina Milnor 3 1
Spring 2018: LATN UN3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3997 001/10527  
Kathy Eden 3 0
LATN 3997 002/60720  
Carmela Franklin 3 0
LATN 3997 003/66558  
Caitlin Gillespie 3 0
LATN 3997 004/23303  
Gareth Williams 3 0
LATN 3997 005/11674  
Darcy Krasne 3 0
LATN 3997 006/05680  
Ellen Morris 3 0
LATN 3997 007/12848  
Katharina Volk 3 0
LATN 3997 011/01489  
Kristina Milnor 3 0

LATN UN3998 Supervised Research in Latin Literature. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies' permission.

A program of research in Latin literature. Research paper required.

Fall 2017: LATN UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3998 001/25766  
Kathy Eden 3 0
LATN 3998 002/26664  
Katharina Volk 3 0
LATN 3998 003/66727  
Carmela Franklin 3 0
LATN 3998 004/04392  
Ellen Morris 3 0
LATN 3998 005/04109  
Kristina Milnor 3 0
Spring 2018: LATN UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 3998 001/64824  
Kathy Eden 3 0
LATN 3998 002/22076  
Carmela Franklin 3 0
LATN 3998 003/62531  
Caitlin Gillespie 3 1
LATN 3998 004/19903  
Gareth Williams 3 0
LATN 3998 005/25336  
Darcy Krasne 3 0
LATN 3998 006/09402  
Ellen Morris 3 0
LATN 3998 007/72705  
Katharina Volk 3 1
LATN 3998 011/03189  
Kristina Milnor 3 2

LATN GU4009 Tacitus: Writing Autocracy. 3 points.

Prerequisites: LATN V3012 or the equivalent.

Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Fall 2017: LATN GU4009
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 4009 001/10929 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
609 Hamilton Hall
Katharina Volk 3 10/20

LATN GU4010 Selections from Latin Literature: ROMAN ELEGY. 3 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN3012 LATN UN3012 or the equivalent.

Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Spring 2018: LATN GU4010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 4010 001/18492 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Darcy Krasne 3 5/15

LATN GU4105 Latin Literature of the Republic. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least two terms of Latin at the 3000-level or higher.

Latin literature from the beginning to early Augustan times.

Fall 2017: LATN GU4105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 4105 001/77491 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
318 Hamilton Hall
Katharina Volk 4 13/20

LATN GU4106 Latin Literature of the Empire. 4 points.

Prerequisites: at least two terms of Latin at the 3000-level or higher.

Latin literature from Augustus to 600 C.E.

Spring 2018: LATN GU4106
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 4106 001/11943 M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Gareth Williams 4 15/20

LATN GU4152 Medieval Latin Literature. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

This course covers various topics in Medieval Latin Literature.

Spring 2018: LATN GU4152
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 4152 001/71421 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Carmela Franklin 3 15/15