English

http://english.barnard.edu/

417 Barnard Hall  
212-854-2116
212-854-9498 (fax)
english@barnard.edu
Department Administrator: Sarah Pasadino
Department Assistant: Rio Santisteban

Mission

The offering in English is designed to foster good writing, effective speaking, and heightened understanding of culturally significant texts. We encourage students majoring in English to develop their responsiveness to the literary imagination and their sensitivity to literary form through disciplined attention to language, historical contexts, and critical and scholarly methods.

For all students, including transfers, a minimum of six semester courses must be completed while the student is in residence at Barnard.

Student Learning Objectives for the English Major and the American Literature, Film, Theatre, and Creative Writing Concentrations

Our objectives represent the teaching aims of the English Department. All instructors are free to decide which of these objectives are consistent with their particular courses and teaching methods.

Students who graduate with a major in English should be able to obtain the following objectives:

  • demonstrate critical and analytical reading skills.
  • demonstrate critical and analytical writing skills.
  • display an understanding of literary genre, form, and language.
  • show a familiarity with the issues of literary criticism and theory.
  • show an awareness of literary history.
  • engage deeply with at least one major author.
  • incorporate secondary sources, with proper citations, in a larger essay.
  • understand texts in their cultural contexts.

Specific to the America Literature Concentration:

  • demonstrate familiarity with American authors and texts across the span of American literary history.
  • analyze American texts of various genres including poetry, fiction, drama, autobiography, and political documents.
  • write a substantial research project on American texts. This project should integrate primary and secondary materials, demonstrating the student's ability to analyze texts and her familiarity with the critical landscape.

Specific to the Film Concentration:

  • explain the major concepts or ideas of film theory.
  • write a basic/elementary screenplay.
  • demonstrate an understanding of film’s relationship to a range of other disciplines across the humanities and social sciences.

Specific to the Theatre Concentration:

  • analyze dramatic literature in the context of theatre history, theory, criticism, and performance.
  • develop skills in critical reading and writing, textual analysis, independent research, and oral presentation.

Specific to the Creative Writing Concentration:

  • develop a mastery of the linguistic demands of a variety of literary forms.
  • demonstrate a critically sound grasp of structure in prose and poetry.
  • explore the formal possibilities of the genres in which they are working.
  • develop critical sophistication in reading and speaking about others' work.
  • grasp the importance of thoroughly revising their own work.
  • detect concrete and figurative language in others’ work.
  • achieve precision in their own use of concrete and figurative language.
  • produce an original piece of fiction, a set of poems, a play, or a work of creative non-fiction.

Chair: Lisa Gordis (Professor)
Professors: James Basker (Richard Gilder Professor of Literary History), Christopher Baswell (Ann Whitney Olin Professor), Yvette Christiansë (Professor of English and Africana Studies), Mary Gordon (Millicent C. McIntosh Professor in English and Writing), Achsah Guibbory (Ann Whitney Olin Professor), Kim Hall (Lucyle Hook Professor of English and Africana Studies), Ross Hamilton (Director, Film Program), Saskia Hamilton (Director, Women Poets at Barnard), Maire Jaanus, Peter Platt, William Sharpe, Maura Spiegel (Term)
Associate Professors: Jennie Kassanoff, Monica Miller
Assistant Professors: Rachel Eisendrath, Aaron Schneider (Term)
Senior Lecturers: Pamela Cobrin (Director, Writing Program; Co-Director, Speaking Program), Patricia Denison (Associate Provost), Peggy Ellsberg, Timea Szell (Director, Creative Writing), Margaret Vandenburg
Lecturers: Benjamin Breyer (First-Year Writing), Vrinda Condillac (First-Year Writing), Wendy Schor-Haim (Director, First-Year Writing), Alexandra Watson (First-Year Writing)
Anna Quindlen Writer in Residence: Jennifer Finney Boylan
Associate: Daniela Kempf (Manager, Speaking Program), Cecelia Lie (Term; Director, First-Year Writing (Workshop); Associate Director, Writing Program)
Post-Doctoral Fellow: Meredith Benjamin (First-Year Writing)
Senior Scholar: Anne Lake Prescott
Adjunct Senior Associate: Quandra Prettyman
Adjunct Associate Professors: Jonathan Beller, Miranda Field (Visiting), Alexandra Horowitz (Visiting), Mary Beth Keane (Visiting), Hisham Matar (The Weiss International Fellow in Literature and the Arts), Ellen McLaughlin (Visiting)
Adjunct Assistant Professors: Annie DeWitt (Visiting)
Adjunct Lecturers: Rachel Abramowitz, Maureen Chun, Monica Cohen, Mary Helen Kolisnyk, Andrew Lynn, Linn Cary Mehta, Donna Paparella, Stefan Pedatella, Sonam Singh
Adjunct Associates: Elizabeth Auran, Shelly Fredman, Penelope Meyers Usher

Requirements for the Major

A major program consists of at least ten courses. Six of the ten must be taken at Barnard or Columbia:

ENGL BC3193Critical Writing (Formerly called Literary Criticism & Theory. Best taken in the sophomore year.)4
ENGL BC3159 and ENGL BC3160 The English Colloquium 1
Two courses in literature written before 1900 26
One additional literature course (excluding the Colloquia and the English Conference).3
Two electives chosen from the entire English Department offering 36
Two senior seminars given by the Barnard English Department 48

At least one of the courses taken for the English major must be in American Literature.  It can simultaneously fulfill other requirements (elective, before 1900, etc.) where appropriate.

1

Taken in the junior year. All sections of 3159 (fall semester) are on the Renaissance; all sections of 3160 (spring semester) are on the Enlightenment. Students may substitute three courses for the two semesters of Colloquium. At least one of these three must cover literature before 1660 (i.e., Medieval or Renaissance); one other must cover literature of the 17th or 18th century (i.e., The Age of Enlightenment); the last can cover either literature before 1660 or literature of the 17th or 18th century. Students may also take one Colloquium and two substitutions, as long as one of the substitutions covers literature of the same period as the Colloquium it replaces. The other substitution may cover either literature of that same time period or literature of the time period of the other Colloquium. In either case, one of the courses used as a substitution for either Colloquium will also count towards satisfying the "before 1900" requirement.  Please note that only one Colloquium substitution may be a Shakespeare course. For further details, refer to the Substitutions tab above.

2

Note: If you have substituted courses for the Colloquium requirement, ONE of the substitutions will count towards fulfillment of this requirement. For details, refer to the Substitutions tab above.

3

Excluding The English Conference, ENGL BC3101 The Writer's Process: A Seminar in the Teaching of Writing, and ENGL BC3123 Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking. With the approval of the Chair of the Barnard Department of English, one course based in the literature of a foreign language (in English translation or in the original language) can count as an elective. See the Substitutions tab above for more details.)

4

Seniors who wish to substitute an Independent Study for one of the two required senior seminars should consult the English Department Chair.  Permission is given rarely and only to proposals meeting the criteria specified under the course description of ENGL BC3999.  Apply by the day before the last day of Program Filing, since the computer system enabling you to register online updates overnight.  The form can be downloaded from our Forms page and must be turned in to the English Department office (417 Barnard Hall).

Requirements for the Minor

A minor consists of at least five English courses (three of which must be qualifying Barnard or Columbia courses):

Select one course from either Chaucer, Shakespeare, or Milton:3
Chaucer:
Chaucer Before Canterbury
Canterbury Tales
Shakespeare:
Renaissance Epic
Shakespeare I
Shakespeare II
Milton:
Milton
Two additional courses in literature before 1900 16
Two electives from the entire English Department offering 26
1

Including ENTH BC3137, certain seminar courses from ENGL BC3129 through ENGL BC3135 if the seminar topic is historically appropriate (please check with the English Department), ENGL BC3141, and ENGL BC3154 - ENGL BC3180. (For more details, visit our more extensive description in the Substitutions tab above.) 

2

Excluding the Colloquia (ENGL BC3159-ENGL BC3160), The English Conference, The Writer's Process (ENGL BC3101), and Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking (ENGL BC3123).  

Concentrations in the Major

All concentrations in the major, except that in American Literature, require 11 courses.

American Literature

Students interested in an American Literature concentration should consult with Professor Lisa Gordis (408D Barnard Hall).

ENGL BC3193Critical Writing4
ENGL BC3159 and ENGL BC3160 The English Colloquium 1
Two courses in literature written before 1900. One of these courses must be either:
American Literature to 1800
American Literature, 1800-1870
One survey course on American literature between 1871 and the present, either:
American Literature, 1871-1945
American Literature since 1945
An additional American literature course
An elective chosen from the entire English Department offering 23
Two senior seminars, one of which must focus on American literature.3
1

Taken in the junior year. Students may substitute three courses for the two semesters of Colloquium.  At least one of these three must cover literature before 1660 (i.e., Medieval or Renaissance); one other must cover literature of the 17th or 18th century (i.e., The Age of Enlightenment); the last can cover either literature before 1660 or literature of the 17th or 18th century. Students may also take one Colloquium and two substitutions, as long as one of the substitutions covers literature of the same period as the Colloquium it replaces.  The other substitution may cover either literature of that same time period or literature of the time period of the other Colloquium. In either case, one of the courses used as a substitution for either Colloquium will also count towards satisfying the "before 1900" requirement. Please note that only one Colloquium substitution may be a Shakespeare course. For further details, refer to the Substitutions tab above.

2

Excluding The English Conference, ENGL BC3101 The Writer's Process: A Seminar in the Teaching of Writing, and ENGL BC3123 Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking. With the approval of the Chair of the Barnard Department of English, one course based in the literature of a foreign language (in English translation or in the original language) can count as an elective.  See the Substitutions tab above for more details.

Film

Students interested in a film concentration should consult Professor Ross Hamilton (419 Barnard Hall). A film concentration consists of four courses:

Introduction to Film and Film Theory:
FILM BC3201Introduction to Film and Media Studies3
or FILM UN1000 Introduction to Film and Media Studies
Film writing: Select one of the following:3
Screenwriting
Feature Film Screenwriting
The English/Film Senior Seminar given by the Barnard English Department
The final course, which requires approval, is a film course selected from among specific offerings at Barnard or Columbia.3

These four courses will count in place of two electives and one senior seminar in the regular English major.

Theatre

Students interested in a theatre concentration should consult Professor Pamela Cobrin (216 Barnard Hall). A theatre concentration consists of four courses:

Select one of the following options:9
Option A:
Western Theatre Traditions: Classic to Romantic
Western Theatre Traditions: Modern
One dramatic literature seminar
Option B:
One theatre history course
Two dramatic literature seminars
A Senior Project 1

These four courses will count in place of two electives and one senior seminar in the regular English major.

1

This may be written in a Senior Seminar with a focus on dramatic literature; written in a dramatic literature course that is combined with ENGL BC3996 Special Project in Theatre, Writing, or Critical Interpretation; or, in rare cases, written in ENGL BC3999 Independent Study.

Writing

Open to a limited number of English majors. Students enter the writing concentration by application only. English majors interested in being considered for the writing concentration should submit 15-20 pages of their writing to Professor Timea Szell, the Director of the Creative Writing Program, by the last day of program filing (occurring in mid-April for the spring semester or in mid-November for the fall semester) in the second semester of their JUNIOR year. A writing concentration consists of at least four courses:

Introductory writing course. Select one of the following:3-6
Creative Non-Fiction: Making Facts Sing
Creative Non-Fiction: Gendered Memoir
Creative Non-Fiction
Advanced writing course:
Advanced Poetry Writing II
Advanced Projects in Prose Writing
Fiction Writing: Longer Forms
Invention, Revision, and Imagination
An elective, either in literature (in English or another language), or creative writing 1
A Senior Project 24

Consult the Director of Creative Writing, Professor Timea Szell (423 Barnard Hall), for applicability of Columbia courses. These four courses will count in place of two electives and one senior seminar in the regular English major.

1

 With the approval of the Chair of the Barnard Department of English, one course based in the literature of a foreign language (in English translation or in the original language) can count as an elective.  (See the Substitutions tab above for more details.)

2

A senior project is usually written in a creative writing course. Please note that you must file a variable point form with the Registrar to earn four points for the course in which you are writing your senior project, and to meet the senior project requirement.  In rare cases, the Senior Project may be written in an Independent Study (ENGL BC3999 Independent Study).

Colloquia Substitutions

ENGL BC3159 and ENGL BC3160 are required of English majors in the junior year.  All sections of 3159 (fall semester) are on the literature of the Renaissance; all sections of 3160 (spring semester) are on the literature of the Enlightenment.

Students may substitute three courses for the two semesters of Colloquium.  At least one of these three must cover literature before 1660 (i.e., Medieval or Renaissance); one other must cover literature of the 17th or 18th century (i.e., The Age of Enlightenment); the last can cover either literature before 1660 or literature of the 17th or 18th century.

Students may also take one Colloquium and two substitutions, as long as one of the substitutions covers literature of the same period as the Colloquium it replaces.  The other substitution may cover either literature of that same time period or literature of the time period of the other Colloquium.

In either case, one of the courses used as a substitute for either the fall or spring Colloquium will also count towards satisfying the "before 1900" requirement.

Please note that only one Colloquium substitution in total may be a Shakespeare course.

Courses which can serve as Colloquium substitutes include

ENGL BC3133Early Modern Women Writers
ENGL BC3135Laughing: Wit and Humor in the Renaissance
ENGL BC3136Renaissance Epic
Select one of the following:
ENTH BC3136Shakespeare in Performance
ENGL BC3163Shakespeare I
ENGL BC3164Shakespeare II
ENTH BC3137Restoration and 18th-Century Drama
ENGL BC3154Chaucer Before Canterbury
ENGL BC3155Canterbury Tales
ENGL BC3158Medieval Literature: Literatures of Medieval Britain
ENGL BC3165The Elizabethan Renaissance: Lyric Poetry
ENGL BC3166Seventeenth-Century Prose and Poetry
ENGL BC3167Milton
ENGL BC3169Renaissance Drama
ENGL BC3170English Literature and Science 1600-1800
ENGL BC3173The Eighteenth-Century Novel
ENGL BC3174The Age of Johnson
or ENGL W4301 Eighteenth-Century English Literature
ENGL BC3179American Literature to 1800
1

Please check with the English Department.

To see if other courses qualify, consult with your major adviser or the Chair of the English Department.

Courses in Literature Written before 1900

Qualifying courses can include ENTH BC3136 Shakespeare in Performance, ENTH BC3137 Restoration and 18th-Century Drama, certain seminar courses from ENGL BC3129 Explorations of Black Literature: Early African-American Lit. 1760-1890 through ENGL BC3135 Laughing: Wit and Humor in the Renaissance if the seminar topic is historically appropriate, ENGL BC3141 Major English Texts I and ENGL BC3154 Chaucer Before Canterbury through ENGL BC3180 American Literature, 1800-1870, excluding the Colloquia. (If you have substituted two or three courses for the Colloquium requirement, one of the substitutions will count towards fulfillment of this requirement.)

To see if other courses qualify, consult your major adviser and the Chair of the English Department.

Substituting with Courses from Other Departments

ENGL BC3193 Critical Writing: (formerly called Literary Criticism & Theory) must be taken in the Barnard English Department.  Other Barnard or Columbia courses may qualify for other requirements as long as the substitution closely matches the general description of the course it is replacing. 

To Qualify as a Substitution

For a literary period requirement, the substituting course must cover material from the same literary period covered by the course it is replacing, not just include some of that period's material in a larger range of literature.  With the approval of the Chair of the Barnard English Department, one literature course taken outside the department in English translation or in another language can count as an elective.  If your adviser or the Chair is not familiar with the course (even if given at Columbia), you must provide the syllabus.

The English Department requires that six of the ten courses required for graduation as an English major be taken at Barnard or Columbia.

Introductory

ENGL BC1204 First-Year Writing (Workshop): Critical Conversations . 4 points.

(Formerly called "First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History (Workshop).") Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively.  Sections will focus on Legacy of the Mediterranean or Women and Culture and meet three times a week.  For more information on the curriculum, please visit the course website: http://firstyear.barnard.edu/rlh

Spring 2017: ENGL BC1204
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1204 001/09633 W F 10:10am - 11:25am
Room TBA
4 0
ENGL 1204 001/09633 M 10:10am - 11:25am
102 Sulzberger Annex
4 0
ENGL 1204 002/05381 T Th F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
102 Sulzberger Annex
Vrinda Condillac 4 9
Fall 2017: ENGL BC1204
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1204 001/06169 M W F 10:10am - 11:25am
404 Barnard Hall
Mary Kolisnyk 4 10
ENGL 1204 002/03033 M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
102 Sulzberger Annex
Penelope Usher 4 13
ENGL 1204 003/08212 T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
403 Barnard Hall
Cecelia Lie 4 12
ENGL 1204 004/05833 T Th F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
406 Barnard Hall
Shelly Fredman 4 14

ENGL BC1210 First-Year Writing: Critical Conversations: Women and Culture. 3 points.

Literary History often portrays women as peripheral characters, confining their power to the islands of classical witches and the attics of Romantic madwomen. This course offers a revisionist response to such constraints of canonicity, especially as they pertain to the marginalization of female subjectivity in literature and culture. The curriculum challenges traditional dichotomies—culture/nature, logos/pathos, mind/body—that cast gender as an essential attribute rather than a cultural construction. Fall term readings include Gilgamesh; Hymn to Demeter; Sophocles, Antigone; Ovid, Metamorphoses; Sei Shonagon, The Pillow Book; Marie de France, Lais; Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales; Kebra Negast; Shakespeare, As You Like It; Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, selected poetry; Aphra Behn, The Rover. Spring term readings include Milton, Paradise Lost; Leonora Sansay, Secret History; Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman; Lady Hyegyong, The Memoirs of Lady Hyegyong; Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Emily Dickinson, selected poetry; Sigmund Freud, selected essays; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Gertrude Stein, Doctor Faustus Lights the Lights; Yvette Christiansë, Castaway.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC1210
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1210 001/05989 M W 5:40pm - 6:55pm
406 Barnard Hall
Catherine Steindler 3 14
ENGL 1210 002/07047 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
102 Sulzberger Annex
Elizabeth Auran 3 15
ENGL 1210 003/06266 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
403 Barnard Hall
Georgette Fleischer 3 13
ENGL 1210 004/07970 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
403 Barnard Hall
Georgette Fleischer 3 11
ENGL 1210 005/08599 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
118 Barnard Hall
Cecelia Lie 3 15
ENGL 1210 006/03564 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
308 Diana Center
Vrinda Condillac 3 15
ENGL 1210 007/07753 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
407 Barnard Hall
Meredith Benjamin 3 14
ENGL 1210 008/00485 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
407 Barnard Hall
Meredith Benjamin 3 15
ENGL 1210 009/07335 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
102 Sulzberger Annex
Rachel Abramowitz 3 15
Fall 2017: ENGL BC1210
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1210 001/05989 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
407 Barnard Hall
Vrinda Condillac 3 14
ENGL 1210 002/07047 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
407 Barnard Hall
Vrinda Condillac 3 15
ENGL 1210 003/07970 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
117 Barnard Hall
Monica Cohen 3 15
ENGL 1210 004/08599 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
403 Barnard Hall
Elizabeth Auran 3 15
ENGL 1210 005/07753 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
308 Diana Center
Vrinda Condillac 3 15
ENGL 1210 006/03946 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
407 Barnard Hall
Meredith Benjamin 3 15
ENGL 1210 007/06891 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
407 Barnard Hall
Meredith Benjamin 3 15

ENGL BC1211 First-Year Writing: Critical Conversations: Legacy of the Mediterranean. 3 points.

This course investigates key intellectual moments in the rich literary history that originated in classical Greece and Rome and continues to inspire some of the world’s greatest masterpieces. Close readings of works reveal how psychological and ideological paradigms, including the self and civilization, shift over time, while the historical trajectory of the course invites inquiry into the myth of progress at the heart of canonicity. Works studied in the fall term include Homer, Odyssey; The Homeric Hymn to Demeter; Euripides, The Bacchae; Virgil, Aeneid; Dante, Inferno; Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales; Margery Kempe, The Book of Margery Kempe; Shakespeare [selection depends on NYC theatre offerings]; Madame de Lafayette, The Princesse de Clèves; Cervantes, Don Quixote. Works studied in the spring term include Milton, Paradise Lost; Voltaire, Candide; Puccini, La Bohème [excursion to the Metropolitan Opera]; William Wordsworth (selected poetry); Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Darwin, Marx, and Freud (selected essays); Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness; T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; J. M. Coetzee, Waiting for the Barbarians.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC1211
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1211 001/04730 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
504 Diana Center
Benjamin Breyer 3 15
ENGL 1211 002/02058 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
214 Milbank Hall
Benjamin Breyer 3 15
ENGL 1211 003/08189 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
406 Barnard Hall
Stefan Pedatella 3 15
ENGL 1211 004/06252 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
406 Barnard Hall
Donna Paparella 3 10
ENGL 1211 005/02446 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
308 Diana Center
Wendy Schor-Haim 3 15
ENGL 1211 006/04318 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
227 Milbank Hall
Sonam Singh 3 13
ENGL 1211 007/09315 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
407 Barnard Hall
Maureen Chun 3 15
ENGL 1211 008/01623 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
407 Barnard Hall
Anne Donlon 3 15
Fall 2017: ENGL BC1211
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1211 001/07758 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
404 Barnard Hall
Donna Paparella 3 13
ENGL 1211 002/04816 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
403 Barnard Hall
Benjamin Breyer 3 15
ENGL 1211 003/06165 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
102 Sulzberger Annex
Stefan Pedatella 3 15
ENGL 1211 004/03034 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
406 Barnard Hall
Benjamin Breyer 3 14
ENGL 1211 005/07763 T Th 8:40am - 9:55am
405 Barnard Hall
Aaron Schneider 3 15
ENGL 1211 006/07291 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
214 Milbank Hall
Benjamin Breyer 3 15
ENGL 1211 007/01880 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
306 Milbank Hall
Maureen Chun 3 15
ENGL 1211 008/08081 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
117 Barnard Hall
Sonam Singh 3 14
ENGL 1211 009/06760 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
325 Milbank Hall
0. FACULTY 3 15

ENGL BC1212 First-Year Writing: Critical Conversations: The Americas. 3 points.

This course transcends traditional and arbitrary distinctions separating Caribbean, North, South, and Central American literatures. The Americas emerge not as colonial subjects but as active historical and aesthetic agents.  Emanating from what might be called the geographical site of modernity, American literature is characterized by unprecedented diversity and innovation.  In addition to classic novels, short stories, and poetry, this multicultural curriculum features works ranging in scope from creation accounts to autobiographies, as well as indigenous genres including captivity and slave narratives that belie New World declarations of independence.   Works studied in the fall term include the Popul Vuh; William Shakespeare, The Tempest; Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, selected poetry; Phillis Wheatley, selected poetry; William Apess, A Son of the Forest; Esteban Echeverria, "El Matadero"; Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Hope Leslie; Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African, Written by Himself; Herman Melville, Benito Cereno. Spring term readings include Mark Twain, Pudd’nhead Wilson; Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; José Marti, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Langston Hughes, selected poetry; T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land; Pablo Neruda, The Heights of Macchu Picchu; Machado de Assis, Dom Casmurro; William Faulkner, "The Bear"; Gabriel García Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC1212
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1212 001/06055 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
102 Sulzberger Annex
Jennifer Rosenthal 3 15
Fall 2017: ENGL BC1212
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1212 001/03496 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
406 Barnard Hall
Linn Mehta 3 15
ENGL 1212 002/04330 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
404 Barnard Hall
Alexandra Watson 3 15
ENGL 1212 003/08520 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
406 Barnard Hall
Alexandra Watson 3 14
ENGL 1212 004/02776 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
407 Barnard Hall
Alexandra Watson 3 15

Writing

ENGL BC3101 The Writer's Process: A Seminar in the Teaching of Writing. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit.

Exploration of theory and practice in the teaching of writing, designed for students who plan to become Writing Fellows at Barnard. Students will read current theory and consider current research in the writing process and engage in practical applications in the classroom or in tutoring.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3101
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3101 001/07765 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
406 Barnard Hall
Pamela Cobrin 3 20

ENGL BC3102 Academic Writing Intensive. 4 points.

Academic Writing Intensive is an intensive writing course for Barnard students in their second or third year. Students attend a weekly seminar, work closely with the instructor on each writing assignment, and meet with an attached Writing Fellow every other week. Readings and assignments focus on transferable writing and revision skills that students can apply to any discipline.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3102
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3102 001/02501 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
303 Altschul Hall
Cecelia Lie 4 6/8

ENGL BC3103 The Art of the Essay. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Students who are on the electronic waiting list or who are interested in the class but are not yet registered MUST attend the first day of class.

(Formerly called Essay Writing.) Essay writing above the first-year level. Reading and writing various types of essays to develop one's natural writing voice and craft thoughtful, sophisticated and personal essays.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3103
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3103 001/07766 W 11:00am - 12:50pm
406 Barnard Hall
Aaron Schneider 3 13/15
ENGL 3103 002/08563 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
404 Barnard Hall
Wendy Schor-Haim 3 9/12
ENGL 3103 003/09867 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
404 Barnard Hall
Margaret Ellsberg 3 12/12

ENGL BC3104 The Art of the Essay. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Can count towards major. Students who are on the electronic waiting list or who are interested in the class but are not yet registered MUST attend the first day of class.

(Formerly called Essay Writing.) Essay writing above the first-year level. Reading and writing various types of essays to develop one's natural writing voice and craft thoughtful, sophisticated and personal essays.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3104
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3104 001/09306 W 11:00am - 12:50pm
403 Barnard Hall
Aaron Schneider 3 13/12
ENGL 3104 002/04332 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 Barnard Hall
Shelly Fredman 3 10/12
ENGL 3104 003/04934 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
117 Barnard Hall
Wendy Schor-Haim 3 9/12
ENGL 3104 004/09861 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
306 Milbank Hall
Cecelia Lie 3 11/12

Creative Writing

A writing sample is required to apply to creative writing courses. As space is limited in creative writing courses, not all students who apply are guaranteed admittance.  If a student simply adds the course to myBarnard or SSOL without submitting a writing sample, it will NOT ensure his or her enrollment.  Creative writing courses are capped at zero on myBarnard and SSOL.  If a student puts the class on his or her online schedule, he or she will automatically be placed on the wait list.  If he or she is accepted, the professor will take him or her off the wait list; until that time, however, no one is officially registered for the class.

Directions on how to apply to creative writing courses are available on the Forms section of the English Department website.  For the fall 2017 semester, we are only accepting online submissions via Google Form.  Click here to be taken to the online application.   The deadline for the Fall 2017 semester is 11:59pm, August 21, 2017.  Admit lists will be posted on the Admit Lists section of the English Department website as the department receives them from the professors.  If an admit list is not posted for a class before its first meeting, attend it.

ENGL BC3105 Fiction and Personal Narrative. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

This class centers on the appreciation, analysis, and practice of short literary fiction, including personal narrative. In addition to weekly writing exercises, twice a semester each student will make available to the entire class longer pieces for "workshopping." These pieces will receive written evaluations from instructor and peers both. We will also read and study narrative by published authors -- historical and contemporary. In both student-generated and published work we will consider elements of prose narrative from structure to characterization, plot to voice, etc., in the hopes that such consideration will encourage student writers to expand their writerly repertoire and improve their work in terms of both craft and literary substance.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3105
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3105 001/03041 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
118 Barnard Hall
Timea Szell 3 12/13
ENGL 3105 002/03997 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
403 Barnard Hall
Mary Keane 3 8/12

ENGL BC3106 Fiction and Personal Narrative. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

In this workshop we will read risky and urgent examples of life writing, from autobiographical fiction to radical and poetic memoir and essay. Some writers we could be reading include Claudia Rankine, Lydia Davis, Hervé Guibert, Chris Kraus, and others. I hope to help you push your texts to their vibrant full potential. We will also be developing an innovative vocabulary to describe the work you're reading and writing. Open to anyone willing to read, write, and rewrite adventurously.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3106
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3106 001/07418 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 Barnard Hall
Katie Zambreno 3 12

ENGL BC3107 Introduction to Fiction Writing. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3107
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3107 001/06175 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
225 Milbank Hall
Weike Wang 3 7/12

ENGL BC3108 Introduction to Fiction Writing. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

Practice in writing short stories with discussion and close analysis in workshop setting.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3108
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3108 001/07586 M 11:00am - 12:50pm
404 Barnard Hall
Kate Walbert 3 11

ENGL BC3110 Introduction to Poetry Writing. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

Our objective in this class is to write new poems each week, and find ways to illuminate and articulate our processes as we go along.  Among the questions we’ll explore:  How do imagination, “real life,” and conscious artifice (among other things) enter into the writing of poems?  How does a poem interface with its reader/listener?  What’s the role of enigma, or even opacity, in poetry?  How much clarity or accessibility is desirable? We’ll read poets representing a range of styles and esthetics, with a slight emphasis on contemporary American work. Regular attendance, full participation in class discussions, keeping an “observations” journal (and sharing writing from it each week), and the submission of a final portfolio of poems written in response to prompts and readings are requirements for earning credit in this class.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3110 001/04251 T 12:00pm - 1:50pm
405 Barnard Hall
Jessica Greenbaum 3 13
Fall 2017: ENGL BC3110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3110 001/03333 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
502 Diana Center
Miranda Field 3 11/12

ENGL BC3113 Playwriting I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

A workshop to provoke and investigate dramatic writing.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3113
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3113 001/09177 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
405 Barnard Hall
Ellen McLaughlin 3 11/12

ENGL BC3114 Playwriting II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

What makes a play alive? Often a playwright is surprised into their strongest work. The practices of experimentation and analysis, curiosity and audacity lead to new possibilities. Students will read and respond to plays, identifying elements and strategies, and each week bring in fragments and scenes written in response to weekly prompts. By the middle of the semester, students will choose the piece that feels the most viable and develop it into what in most cases will be a thirty page play.   NOTE: Playwriting I (ENGL 3113) is NOT a prerequisite, and students need not have written a play before.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3114
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3114 001/02721 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
102 Sulzberger Annex
Kathleen Tolan 3 11

ENGL BC3115 Story Writing I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Some experience in the writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged. Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3115
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3115 001/02610 Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
405 Barnard Hall
Mary Keane 3 10/12

ENGL BC3116 Story Writing II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Some experience in writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged. Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3116
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3116 001/08412 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
403 Barnard Hall
Mary Keane 3 12

ENGL BC3117 Fiction Writing. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Previous experience or introductory class required. Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

"I had given myself up to the idleness of a haunted man who looks for nothing but words wherein to capture his visions."-Joseph Conrad. Given that reading is the one training tool writers cannot do without, this course aims to demonstrate how one might read as a writer. What sets this course apart is its focus, allotted equally, to creative writing and creative reading. Students will produce original prose fiction-which will be discussed in workshops-and engage in close reading of a wide selection of novels and short stories.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3117
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3117 001/09348 M 11:00am - 12:50pm
405 Barnard Hall
Hisham Matar 3 12/12

ENGL BC3118 Advanced Poetry Writing I. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

Weekly workshops designed to generate and critique new poetry. Each participant works toward the development of a cohesive collection of poems. Readings in traditional and contemporary poetry will also be included.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3118
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3118 001/03566 M 11:00am - 12:50pm
406 Barnard Hall
Saskia Hamilton 3 10/12

ENGL BC3120 Creative Non-Fiction: Making Facts Sing. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

This course will challenge students to take on what are considered either difficult topics (e.g. in science and math) or "mundane" topics and create convincing and clear narratives therefrom. We will consider writing from John McPhee, Natalie Angier, Oliver Sacks, Nicholson Baker, and others. Through iterative writing exercises, research, and interviews, students will learn how to breathe life into complex material.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3120 001/06759 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
307 Milbank Hall
Alexandra Horowitz 3 7/12

ENGL BC3122 Creative Non-Fiction: Gendered Memoir. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

A workshop in writing short autobiographical story with particular attention to the role gender plays in shaping experience. Focus on student writing, along with readings from the work of authors such as Augusten Buroughs; Alice Sebold; Alison Bechdel; Mary Karr, and others.
,PLEASE NOTE: This course has been renumbered. It was previously ENGL BC3120, section 3 and has not changed in content.

ENGL BC3125 Advanced Poetry Writing II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

A further study of poetic practice for committed student-writers with experience in writing and reading poems. In the classroom, student poems and ideas about poetics are shared, questioned, and critiqued. There will also be readings in and critical interpretation of traditional and contemporary poetry.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3125
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3125 001/05003 Th 11:00am - 12:50pm
403 Barnard Hall
Catherine Barnett 3 11

ENGL BC3126 Advanced Projects in Prose Writing. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

Independent projects in imaginative writing in prose, including the genres of fiction, nonfiction, memoir, novellas, inter-related stories, and others. Class meetings consist of a few initial lectures on narrative followed by workshops focused on student writing in progress.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3126
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3126 001/06129 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
325 Milbank Hall
Jennifer Boylan 3 12

ENGL BC3132 Fiction Writing: Longer Forms. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

This course will explore longer fictional forms: linked stories, novels and novellas.

ENGL BC3134 Creative Non-Fiction. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

In this course, we'll learn some of the techniques involved in writing an entertaining, informative profile.  Topics we will cover in reading and writing assignments will include the question of "objectivity" in profile-writing, how to convey complex controversies in lucid, lively prose, how to structure a long form article, strategies for interviewing difficult interview subjects, and what makes an enticing lede.

ENGL BC3150 Invention, Revision, and Imagination. 3 points.

A creative writing workshop in fiction,  devoted to the imaginative process, and most specifically, to the arts of invention and revision. In addition to considering the wellspring of creative ideas themselves, students will write stories in a variety of lengths— moderate, long, and as short-shorts.  Through this process, apprentice writers will become intimate with the most essential aspect of creating imaginative work: the dedication to seeing one’s ideas—just like the human soul itself-- morph and grow over time, until it finds its most perfect draft.

Speech

Registration in these courses is limited.

ENGL BC3121 Public Speaking. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students. Open only to undergraduates, preference to seniors and juniors. Attend first class for instructor permission. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.

This course will introduce you to principles of effective public speaking and debate, and provide practical opportunities to use these principles in structured speaking situations. You will craft and deliver speeches, engage in debates and panel discussions, analyze historical and contemporary speakers, and reflect on your own speeches and those of your classmates. You will explore and practice different rhetorical strategies with an emphasis on information, persuasion and argumentation. For each speaking assignment, you will go through the speech-making process, from audience analysis, purpose and organization, to considerations of style and delivery. The key criteria in this course are content, organization, and adaptation to the audience and purpose. While this is primarily a performance course, you will be expected to participate extensively as a listener and critic, as well as a speaker.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3121 001/09138 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
302 Barnard Hall
Daniela Kempf 3 14
Fall 2017: ENGL BC3121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3121 001/09841 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
302 Barnard Hall
Daniela Kempf 3 16

ENGL BC3123 Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit. Enrollment restricted to Barnard students.

Speaking involves a series of rhetorical choices regarding vocal presentation, argument construction, and physical affect that, whether made consciously or by default, project information about the identity of the speaker. In this course students will relate theory to practice: to learn principles of public speaking and speech criticism for the purpose of applying these principles as peer tutors in the Speaking Fellow Program.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3123
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3123 001/05613 Th 10:00am - 11:25am
325 Milbank Hall
Pamela Cobrin, Daniela Kempf 3 12
ENGL 3123 001/05613 T 10:10am - 11:25am
406 Barnard Hall
Pamela Cobrin, Daniela Kempf 3 12

Theatre

Registration in ENTH seminars is limited to 16 students. See Theatre Department course descriptions for Western Theatre Traditions: Classical to Romantic (THTR V 3150) and Western Theatre Traditions: Modern (THTR V 3151).

ENTH BC3136 Shakespeare in Performance. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students. Preference given to juniors and seniors. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date, time, and location that sign-up sheets go up is listed here: http://english.barnard.edu/sign-ups

Shakespeare's plays as theatrical events. Differing performance spaces, acting traditions, directorial frames, theatre practices, performance theories, critical studies, cultural codes, and historical conventions promote differing modes of engagement with drama in performance. We will explore Shakespeare's plays in the context of actual and possible performance from the Renaissance to the twenty-first century.

ENTH BC3137 Restoration and 18th-Century Drama. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date, time, and location that sign-up sheets go up is listed here: http://english.barnard.edu/sign-ups

Performance conventions, dramatic structures, and cultural contexts from 1660 to 1800.  Playwrights include Wycherley, Etherege, Behn, Trotter, Centlivre, Dryden, Congreve, Farquhar, Gay, Goldsmith, and Sheridan.  

ENTH BC3139 Modern American Drama and Performance. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date, time, and location that sign-up sheets go up is listed here: http://english.barnard.edu/sign-ups

Modern American drama in the context of theatrical exploration, cultural contestation, performance history, and social change. Playwrights include Crothers, Glaspell, O'Neill, Odets, Wilder, Stein, Williams, Miller, Hansberry, Albee, Fornes, Kennedy, Mamet, Parks, and Ruhl.

ENTH BC3144 Black Theatre. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Exploration of Black Theater, specifically African-American performance traditions, as an intervening agent in racial, cultural, and national identity. African-American theatre artists to be examined include Amiri Baraka, Kia Corthron, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angelina Grimke, Langston Hughes, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Adrienne Kennedy, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrian Piper, and August Wilson. Fulfills one (of two) required courses in dramatic literature for Theatre/Drama and Theatre Arts major.

Spring 2017: ENTH BC3144
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTH 3144 001/03482 Th 11:00am - 12:50pm
407 Barnard Hall
Pamela Cobrin 4 20/15

ENTH BC3145 Early American Drama and Performance: Staging a Nation. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date, time, and location that sign-up sheets go up is listed here: http://english.barnard.edu/sign-ups

Competing constructions of American identity in the United States date back to the early republic when a newly emerging nation struggled with the questions: What makes an American American? What makes America America? From colonial times forward, the stage has served as a forum to air differing beliefs as well as medium to construct new beliefs about Nation, self and other. The texts we will read, from colonial times through WWI, explore diverse topics such as politics, Native American rights, slavery, labor unrest, gender roles, and a growing immigrant population.

ENTH BC3147 Shakespeare, Theory, Performance. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Course focuses on the historical and theoretical implications of Shakespearean drama  in performance; attention given to early modern and modern history of Shakespeare's plays onstage, and to film, television, and digital performance. Substantial engagement with literary, cultural, and performance theory.   Fulfills one (of two) required courses in dramatic literature OR Shakespeare requirement for Theatre/Drama and Theatre Arts majors.

ENTH BC3186 Modern Drama. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date, time, and location that sign-up sheets go up is listed here: http://english.barnard.edu/sign-ups

Course traces the literary, theoretical, and historical development of drama from the 1850s onward, treating the plays of (among others) Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Brecht, Beckett, Soyinka, Churchill, and critical/theoretical texts by Nietzsche, Freud, Brecht, Artaud, Butler, and others.

Language and Literature

ENGLISH CONFERENCE (ENGL BC3091 through ENGL BC3099): Various topics presented by visiting scholars in courses that will meet for two to four weeks during each semester. Topics, instructors, and times will be announced by the department. Students must attend all classes to receive credit for this course.

ENGL BC3093 The English Conference: The Lucyle Hook Guest Lectureship. 1 point.

Prerequisites: To be taken only for P/F. Students must attend all classes to receive credit for this course.

Please note:  The four course sessions for The English Conference in spring 2017 are February 6th, 13th, 20th, and 27th, 2017.  Consult the English Department's website for a course description.

ENGL BC3094 The English Conference: The Lucyle Hook Guest Lectureship. 1 point.

Prerequisites: To be taken only for P/F. Students must attend all classes to receive credit for this course. Enrollment limited to 60 students.

Please note:  The four course sessions for The English Conference in fall 2017 are October 16, 23, 30, and November 13.  Consult the English Department's website for a course description.

ENGL BC3129 Explorations of Black Literature: Early African-American Lit. 1760-1890. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students.

Poetry, prose, fiction, and nonfiction, with special attention to the slave narrative. Includes Wheatley, Douglass, and Jacobs, but emphasis will be on less familiar writers such as Brown, Harper, Walker, Wilson, and Forten. Works by some 18th-century precursors will also be considered.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3129
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3129 001/08519 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
405 Barnard Hall
Quandra Prettyman 3 14/18

ENGL BC3130 The American Cowboy and the Iconography of the West. 3 points.

We will consider the image and role of the cowboy in fiction, social history, film, music, and art. Readings will include Cormac McCarthy's "The Border Trilogy.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3130
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3130 001/00434 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
407 Barnard Hall
Margaret Ellsberg 3 11/12

ENGL BC3131 The Shadow Knows. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 25 students.

The well-known story of Peter Pan's lost shadow, attached by Wendy, seems to belong to the world of fantasy.  But it reminds us of an everyday fact: in the world of art, shadows are arbitrary.  They can come and go at the whim of artist or writer.  While in life we have shadows with us as long as we breathe, in literature and the visual arts, and often in our spoken words, they require--and deserve--constant attention.  If on a literal level shadows emphasize light, space, and corporeal reality, in artistic uses and metaphoric speech they express some of our deepest emotions, from fear to desire; they invoke mystery and misery; they teach us and tease us.  This course will investigate both real-world and artistic shadows, using texts and images from philosophy, literature, painting, sculpture, photography, and film.  We will study texts by Plato, Pliny, Chamisso, Andersen, Shakespeare, Donne, Dickens, Poe, Conrad, Barrie, and others; and visual images by Masaccio, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Munch, Hopper; Talbot, Stieglitz, Strand, Brassai, Murnau, Wiene, Duchamp, DeChirico, Warhol, and others.

ENGL BC3133 Early Modern Women Writers. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students. PLEASE NOTE: starting the spring 2015 semester, there will NOT be a departmental sign-up sheet for this class.

Despite popular conceptions insisting that the ideal Renaissance woman was silent, as well as chaste and obedient, many women in the early modern period (c. 1550-1800) defied such sentiments by writing, circulating and publishing their own literature. Under the influence of humanism, a generation of educated women arose who would become both the audience for and contributors to the great flowering of literature written in sixteenth and seventeenth century England. As we examine how these women addressed questions of love, marriage, age, race and class, we will also consider the roles women and ideas about gender played in the production of English literature. We will read from a range of literary (plays & poetry) and non-literary (cookbooks, broadside, midwifery books) texts. Seminar participants will be asked to circulate a formal paper for peer review and complete two digital projects.

AFEN BC3134 Unheard Voices: African Women's Literature. 4 points.

How does one talk of women in Africa without thinking of Africa as a 'mythic unity'? We will consider the political, racial, social and other contexts in which African women write and are written about in the context of their located lives in Africa and in the African Diaspora.

ENGL BC3135 Laughing: Wit and Humor in the Renaissance. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

USED TO BE 3137 SEC. 2: NUMBERING HAS CHANGED, NOT CONTENT. An examination of the varieties of wit and humor in the European Renaissance, with an emphasis on England. How was wit imagined? What were its benefits? How did laughter affect the body? Why is sex funny? How does wit relate to cruelty? Authors include Arentino, Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, Louise Labé, Thomas More, Philip Sidney, John Harrington (inventor of the water closet), John Donne, Aphra Behn, and some joke collections.

ENGL BC3136 Renaissance Epic. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The epic tradition raises crucial questions about the interrelationship of literature and power. In telling the story of war and empire building, how does epic both promote and also challenge the cause of the winner? How does epic preserve a space for more lyrical forms of subjectivity? What does this literary form tell about the role of women, the nameless majority and the global ‘other' in the West? In this course, we will trace the European epic tradition, studying Homer's Iliad, Virgil's Aeneid, Spenser's The Faerie Queene and Milton's Paradise Lost. Finally, we will read a contemporary poet's reflection on this tradition, Alice Oswald's Memorial: An Excavation of the Iliad.

ENGL BC3137 Coetzee, Ishiguro and Sebald. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 with priority given to Juniors and Seniors.

This seminar will undertake close readings of works by three masters of the contemporary novel.  Their narrative engagements with the watershed events of the Twentieth Century will draw our attention to matters of collective and national memory, dislocation, migrancy, bare life, human rights, dignity, the human and post-human, loss, reconciliation, forgiveness.  The narrative innovations introduced by these authors re-calibrate interiority and advance an ethics of reading.

ENGL BC3141 Major English Texts I. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 25 students.

A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Autumn: Beowulf through Johnson.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3141
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3141 001/04066 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
409 Barnard Hall
Margaret Ellsberg 3 20/25

ENGL BC3142 Major English Texts II. 3 points.

A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Spring: Romantic poets through the present.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3142
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3142 001/08545 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
202 Milbank Hall
Margaret Ellsberg 3 19/25

ENGL BC3143 Middle Fictions: Long Stories, Short Novels, Novellas. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Discussion of fictions between 60-150 pages in length. Authors include James, Joyce, Mann, Nabokov, Cather, Welty, West, Porter, Olsen, Trevor.

AFEN BC3146 Resisting Stereotypy, Resisting the Spectral Self: African Diasporic Counter Images. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students.

"Sticks and stones may break my bones, but names will never hurt..." Well. Hmm. This course focuses on theories of stereotypy and its mechanisms. We engage visual images (cinematographic, photographic and painterly) and print culture (novels, poems) that traffic in stereotypes and we consider resistances to these. We read comparatively across African American, African diasporic and African works. We do so by considering the arenas in which stereotyping practices and resistances to do battle: the public sphere and the private, the national and transnational/global. Our readings consider the psychic, political and economic violences of stereotypy as race, gender, sexuality, class, religion and nationality are invoked and manipulated.

ENGL BC3146 Walk This Way. 3 points.

What's in a walk?  This course undertakes an interdisciplinary study of a fundamental human activity, focusing on philosophical and aesthetic treatments of human locomotion.  After first examining the history of walking as a social, economic, religious, and political activity, the course will concentrate on urban walking and how it has been represented in text and image from ancient times to the present.  Topics will include walking as introspection, escape, recreation, and discovery; walking and gender; the psychogeography of walking, walking in the city, etc.  Readings from Austen, Wordsworth, Dickens, Thoreau, Whitman, Joyce, Woolf, O'Hara, De Certeau, and many others.  Images from film, painting, and photography to be provided by student research.  Ditto for musical strolls.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3146
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3146 001/02771 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
328 Milbank Hall
William Sharpe 3 55/45

ENGL BC3147 Introduction to Narrative Medicine. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Post-bacc students require instructor permission.

Narrative Medicine was designed to give doctors and healthcare professionals a more profound understanding of, and empathy for, the experience of illness. It teaches how to listen and what to listen for. While the skills developed are directly applicable to the practice of medicine, they are also important in any field in which human relationships are central: business, law, architecture, social work, and the creative arts. The multidisciplinary course entails a rigorous integration of didactic and experiential methodology to develop a heightened awareness of self and others and build a practical set of narrative competencies.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3147
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3147 001/01084 T 12:00pm - 1:50pm
306 Milbank Hall
Charlotte Friedman, Rory Jones 4 12/15

AFEN BC3148 Literature of the Great Migration: 1916-1970. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited 18 students.

Explores, through fiction, poetry, essays, and film, the historical context and cultural content of the African American migration from the rural south to the urban cities of the north, with particular emphasis on New York, Chicago, Detroit, and Philadelphia.

ENGL BC3154 Chaucer Before Canterbury. 3 points.

  Chaucer's innovations with major medieval forms: lyric, the extraordinary dream visions, and the culmination of medieval romance, Troilus and Criseyde. Approaches through close analysis, and feminist and historicist interpretation. Background readings in medieval life and culture.

ENGL BC3155 Canterbury Tales. 3 points.

Chaucer as inheritor of late-antique and medieval conventions and founder of early modern literature and the fiction of character.  Selections from related medieval texts.

ENGL BC3158 Medieval Literature: Literatures of Medieval Britain. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

It's easy to forget that medieval literature wasn't always old and "quaint" as it seems to many of us today. For writers and artists of that era, they were modern, too. But they also imagined their own past and (like many of us) they often had a nostalgic yearning for that lost time. This course will explore a number of forms of medieval literature, mostly British but also some continental, as it explores versions of its past, and especially the ultimately tragic story of King Arthur. We will read across many medieval genres, including some little known today, like lives of saints. But the course will focus on narratives of quest: heroic, psychological, and erotic. We will also explore some of the often beautiful medieval manuscripts in which these texts were often copied. We will read most Middle English texts in the original language; we'll study French and Latin texts in translation.

ENGL BC3159 The English Colloquium. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors.

In the Renaissance colloquium we will examine English and European imaginative and intellectual life from the sixteenth to mid-seventeenth centuries. Defined by humanism, the Protestant Reformation, and revolution, this was a period of ideological struggle on many levels. Long-held ways of ordering the world came under increasing strain-and sometimes ruptured irreparably. Writers discussed and debated the aims of human knowledge, retooled old literary forms for new purposes, scrambled to take account of an expanded awareness of the globe, and probed the tension between belief and doubt. Throughout this process, they experimented with new literary styles to express their rapidly changing worldviews. This is an intensive course in which we will take multiple approaches to a variety of authors that may include Petrarch, Erasmus, Machiavelli, Castiglione, More, Rabelais, Luther, Calvin, Montaigne, Spenser, Bacon, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Milton, and Behn, among others.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3159
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3159 001/07287 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
403 Barnard Hall
Rachel Eisendrath 4 15/14
ENGL 3159 002/06177 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
117 Barnard Hall
Maire Jaanus 4 12/14
ENGL 3159 003/05338 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
117 Barnard Hall
Anne Prescott 4 13/14
ENGL 3159 004/09384 W 11:00am - 12:50pm
306 Milbank Hall
Achsah Guibbory 4 16/16

ENGL BC3160 The English Colloquium. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors.

In the Enlightenment colloquium we will look at English and European imaginative and intellectual life during the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. During this period, writers tried in new ways to reconcile the tensions between reason and religion. Categories of thought that underlie our world today were taking shape: secularity, progress, the public and the private, individual rights, religious tolerance. Writers articulated principles of equality in an era of slavery. Literary forms like the novel, which emerges into prominence during this period, express in irreducibly complex ways these and other changes. In this intensive course, we will study from multiple angles a variety of authors that may include Hobbes, Dryden, Locke, Spinoza, Lafayette, Defoe, Swift, Pope, Richardson, Voltaire, Fielding, Johnson, Diderot, Sterne, and Wollstonecraft, among others.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3160
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3160 001/08864 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
501 Diana Center
Aaron Schneider 4 11/13
ENGL 3160 002/04835 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
403 Barnard Hall
Maire Jaanus 4 15/13
ENGL 3160 003/09761 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
403 Barnard Hall
James Basker 4 15/13
ENGL 3160 004/03694 W 12:00pm - 1:50pm
405 Barnard Hall
Achsah Guibbory 4 18/13

ENGL BC3163 Shakespeare I. 3 points.

A critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances.
,Please note that you do not need to take ENGL BC3163: Shakespeare I and ENGL BC3164: Shakespeare II in sequence; you may take them in any order.

ENGL BC3164 Shakespeare II. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60 students.

Critical and historical introduction to selected comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances by Shakespeare. Please note that you do not need to take ENGL BC3163: Shakespeare I and ENGL BC3164: Shakespeare II in sequence; you may take them in any order.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3164
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3164 001/08079 M W 8:40am - 9:55am
323 Milbank Hall
Peter Platt 3 38/60

ENGL BC3165 The Elizabethan Renaissance: Lyric Poetry. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

In this course, we will read closely the lyric poetry of Petrarch, Ronsard, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Greville, Barnfield, Donne, Chapman, Raleigh, Jonson. In what ways did the lyric serve as a vehicle for expressing a highly interiorized subjectivity? And how did this interiorized subjectivity reflect a changing world?

ENGL BC3166 Seventeenth-Century Prose and Poetry. 3 points.

The seventeenth-century produced some of the best lyric poetry (about love and desire, doubt and faith, sex and God). It was also a century of revolution in science, politics, and religion, producing the emergence of modern ways of thinking. So we will read poetry by John Donne, Aemelia Lanyer, George Herbert, Robert Herrick, Andrew Marvell, Aphra Behn and others. For science, politics, religion, and philosophy, we will read selections from Francis Bacon, Robert Burton, Thomas Browne, Thomas Hobbes and early communists (called "The Levellers"). We begin with Donne as an introduction to the period.

ENGL BC3167 Milton. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes and selections of Milton's earlier poetry and prose (defenses of free press, divorce, individual conscience, political and religious liberty) read within the context of religious, political, and cultural history, but with a sense of connection to present issues.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3167
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3167 001/03481 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
203 Diana Center
Achsah Guibbory 3 19

ENGL BC3168 Lyric Poetry: an Introduction. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This course studies the lyric poem (primarily in English and English translation), its forms, features, and sources, its histories and traditions in print from the fourteenth to the twenty-first centuries. We will review sonnets, ballads, hymns, odes, and elegies; fragments and free verse; the pastoral and its relatives (nature poetry, political poetry); the roles of allusion, metaphor, and figuration. Formal and historical questions will be central to discussions.

ENGL BC3169 Renaissance Drama. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 25 students.

This class will examine English drama at the moment when it arose as a major art form. In Renaissance London, astonishingly complex plays emerged that reflected the diverse urban life of the city, as well as the layered and often contradictory inner life of the individual. This poetically rich theater was less concerned with presenting answers, and more with staging questions—about gender, race, religion, literary tradition, love, sex, authority, and class. In this course, we will try to tap into this theater’s cosmopolitan, enlivened poetics by studying not only Shakespeare, but also the various other major authors who constituted this literary world: Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Middleton, John Webster, and the female playwright Aphra Behn.

ENGL BC3170 English Literature and Science 1600-1800. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The "Scientific Revolution" began in England in the early seventeenth century, with the experiments of John Dee and the reforming projects of Francis Bacon, to culminate in Isaac Newton's discovery of the natural laws of motion. This was also a period of great literary innovation, from Shakespeare's plays and the metaphysical poetry of Marvell and Donne, to the new genre of the novel. This course will explore both the scientific and literary "revolutions" - indeed we will attempt to put them in a kind of conversation with one another, as poets and scientists puzzled over the nature of spirit, body, and the world.

ENGL BC3171 The Novel and Psychoanalysis. 3 points.

The novel in its cultural context, with an accent on psychoanalysis (but no required reading).  Austen, Emily Bronte, Dickens, Hardy, D.H. Lawrence, Didion, Duras, and W.G. Sebald.

ENGL BC3173 The Eighteenth-Century Novel. 3 points.

The development of the novel form in Great Britain.  Topics will include: epistolary fiction, the novel of sentiment, Gothicism; the novel's roots in romance, satire, and the picaresque; modern theories of the origins and development of the novel. Works by: Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, Austen, and others.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3173
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3173 001/03012 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
302 Barnard Hall
Ross Hamilton 3 30

ENGL BC3174 The Age of Johnson. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

                  The works of Johnson, Boswell, and their contemporaries in historic context; rise of the novel (Richardson, Fielding, and Sterne); poets from Pope to Blake and Wordsworth; women writers from Carter to Collier to Wollstonecraft; working class writers; topics include slavery and abolition in literature, the democratization of culture, and the transition to romanticism.

ENGL BC3176 The Romantic Era. 3 points.

  Romantic writers in their intellectual, historical, and political context, with reference to contemporary movements in philosophy, music, and the plastic arts. Authors include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, P.B. Shelley, and Keats. An emphasis on close reading of the poetry.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3176
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3176 001/02992 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
409 Barnard Hall
Ross Hamilton 3 24

ENGL BC3177 Victorian Age in Literature: The Novel. 3 points.

This course explores important works from one of the most vibrant periods in the history of the novel. Beginning with Jane Austen, the most significant transitional figure from the preceding period, other authors may include Gaskell, Dickens, C. Brontë, Eliot, Hardy, and James. While attending to form and style, we will focus on the relation of these fictional worlds to the social realities of the time, and on how the novels reflect and challenge Victorian ideas about self and society, education, ambition and social class, femininity and desire, labor and domesticity.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3177
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3177 001/05643 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
302 Barnard Hall
Mary Cregan 3 40/41

ENGL BC3178 Victorian Poetry and Criticism. 3 points.

Poetry, art, and aesthetics in an industrial society, with emphasis on the role of women as artists and objects. Poems by Tennyson, Arnold, Christina and D.G. Rossetti, Swinburne, and Elizabeth and Robert Browning; criticism by Ruskin, Arnold, and Wilde; paintings by the Pre-Raphaelites and Whistler; photographs by J.M. Cameron.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3178
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3178 001/04900 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
203 Diana Center
William Sharpe 3 28/35

ENGL BC3179 American Literature to 1800. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Early American histories, autobiographies, poems, plays, and novels tell stories of pilgrimage and colonization; private piety and public life; the growth of national identity; Puritanism, Quakerism, and Deism; courtship and marriage; slavery and abolition. Writers include Bradford, Shepard, Bradstreet, Taylor, Rowlandson, Edwards, Wheatley, Franklin, Woolman, and Brown.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3179
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3179 001/08102 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
409 Barnard Hall
Lisa Gordis 3 21

ENGL BC3180 American Literature, 1800-1870. 3 points.

Beginning with literature from the late Republican period, this course considers how nascent efforts to forge a national identity culminate in Civil War.  Writers include Brown, Irving, Emerson, Poe, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Douglass, Melville, Jacobs, Whitman, and Dickinson.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3180
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3180 001/04294 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
323 Milbank Hall
Margaret Vandenburg 3 45/55

ENGL BC3181 American Literature, 1871-1945. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

American literature in the context of cultural and historical change. Writers include Whitman, Melville, Twain, James, Hopkins, Wharton, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Hurston.

ENGL BC3182 American Fiction. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

American fiction from the 18th to the early 20th centuries.  Writers include Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Alcott, Twain, James, Wharton, Faulkner, Wright.

ENGL BC3183 American Literature since 1945. 3 points.

In the wake of World War II, the so-called American Century rises out of the ashes of fascism, haunted by the specter of bombs blurring the boundary between victory and defeat.  An ideological civil war ensues, punctuated by literary resistance to grand narratives and their discontents.  Authors include Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Bishop, Pynchon, Robinson, Merrill, Morrison, Didion, and Wallace.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3183
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3183 001/04988 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
328 Milbank Hall
Margaret Vandenburg 3 46/56

ENGL BC3185 Modern British and American Poetry. 3 points.

Poetry written in English during the past century, discussed in the context of modernism, postmodernism, literary theory, and changing social and technological developments.  Students will participate in shaping the syllabus and leading class discussion.  Authors may include Yeats, Williams, Eliot, Moore, Bishop, Rich, Ginsberg, Stevens, O' Hara, Plath, Brooks, Jordan, Walcott, Alexie, and many others.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3185
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3185 001/07443 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
409 Barnard Hall
William Sharpe 3 35/30

ENGL BC3187 American Writers and Their Foreign Counterparts. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Developments in modern literature as seen in selected 19th- and 20th-century American, European, and English works by Flaubert, James, Proust, Joyce, Chekhov, Porter, Cather, Ibsen, O'Neill, Fitzgerald, Rilke, and others.

ENGL BC3188 The Modern Novel. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).

Examines formal changes in the novel from nineteenth-century realism to stream of consciousness, montage, and other modernist innovations. Social and historical contexts include World War I, urbanization, sexuality and the family, empire and colonialism. Works of Henry James, E. M. Forster, Ford Madox Ford, Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3188
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3188 001/09221 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
Ll103 Diana Center
Rachel Abramowitz 3 33/50

ENGL BC3189 Postmodernism. 3 points.

This course considers how Postmodernism's profound distrust of language and narrative transforms the form and function of literature. Writers include Barthelme, Pynchon, Didion, Morrison, Robinson, Banville, Coetzee, Ishiguro, Hass, and Hejinian.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3189
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3189 001/00217 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
328 Milbank Hall
Margaret Vandenburg 3 45/56

ENGL BC3192 Exile and Estrangement in Global Literature. 4 points.

"I would never be part of anything. I would never really belong anywhere, and I knew it, and all my life would be the same, trying to belong, and failing. Always something would go wrong. I am a stranger and I always will be, and after all I didn't really care."-Jean Rhys. This course examines the experiential life of the novelist as both artist and citizen. Through the study of the work of two towering figures in 20th century literature, we will look at the seemingly contradictory condition of the novelist as both outsider and integral to society, as both observer and expresser of time's yearnings and passions. In different ways and with different repercussions, Jean Rhys and Albert Camus were born into realities shaped by colonialism. They lived across borders, identities and allegiances. Rhys was neither black-Caribbean nor white-English. Albert Camus could be said to have been both French and Algerian, both the occupier and the occupied, and, perhaps, neither. We will look at how their work reflects the contradictions into which they were born. We will trace, through close reading and open discussion, the ways in which their art continues to have lasting power and remain, in light of the complexities of our own time, vivid, true and alive. The objective is to pinpoint connections between novelistic form and historical time. The uniqueness of the texts we will read lies not just in their use of narrative, ideas and myths, but also in their resistance to generalization. We will examine how our novelists' existential position, as both witnesses and participants, creates an opportunity for fiction to reveal more than the author intends and, on the other hand, more than power desires.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3192
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3192 001/03784 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
404 Barnard Hall
Hisham Matar 4 15/16

ENGL BC3193 Critical Writing. 4 points.

(Formerly called Literary Criticism & Theory.) Provides experience in the reading and analysis of literary texts and some knowledge of conspicuous works of literary criticism. Frequent short papers. Required of all English majors before the end of the junior year. Sophomores are encouraged to take it in the spring semester even before officially declaring their major. Transfer students should plan to take it in the fall semester.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3193
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3193 001/06184 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
102 Sulzberger Annex
Rachel Eisendrath 4 9/10
ENGL 3193 002/03226 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
406 Barnard Hall
Andrew Lynn 4 9/10
ENGL 3193 003/07448 M 12:00pm - 1:50pm
405 Barnard Hall
Stefan Pedatella 4 9/10
ENGL 3193 004/06602 W 11:00am - 12:50pm
102 Sulzberger Annex
John Pagano 4 13/10
Fall 2017: ENGL BC3193
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3193 001/06184 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
405 Barnard Hall
Rachel Eisendrath 4 12/12
ENGL 3193 002/03226 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
117 Barnard Hall
Rachel Abramowitz 4 8/12
ENGL 3193 003/00212 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
303 Altschul Hall
Maura Spiegel 4 8/12
ENGL 3193 004/07448 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
117 Barnard Hall
Timea Szell 4 13/12
ENGL 3193 005/06722 W 11:00am - 12:50pm
405 Barnard Hall
Margaret Vandenburg 4 14/14

ENGL BC3195 Modernism. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 56.

Psychoanalysis, world war, and shifting gender paradigms inspire fragmented narratives, stream-of-consciousness prose, and improbable blends of erudition and the avant-garde. Stylistic innovation notwithstanding, Modernism authorizes a remarkably traditional literary canon. Special attention will be devoted to how seminal manifestos, most notably "Tradition and the Individual Talent" and A Room of One's Own, frame the movement's embattled aesthetics. Works by Eliot, Woolf, Barnes, Faulkner, Hemingway, Joyce, Lawrence, Pound, Stein, Toomer, and Yeats.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3195
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3195 001/04680 T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
328 Milbank Hall
Margaret Vandenburg 3 41/56

ENGL BC3196 Home to Harlem: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students.

In the spring of 2016, ENGL 3196y will be centered on the relationship between art, activism and social justice as this relationship was developed during the Harlem Renaissance and beyond. Exploring the cultural contexts and aesthetic debates that animated Harlem in 1920s to 1930s, the course will focus on the politics of literary and theatrical production, and explore the fashioning and performance of New Negro identity through fiction, poetry, essays, and artwork, with special attention to theater/performance. This course will partner with Harlem's National Black Theater and work toward an understanding of the relationship between art/literature and socio-political change through the NBT's spring 2016 production of Dominique Morisseau's Blood on the Root, a multi-genre performance piece on racial injustice inspired by the 2006 Jena Six case in Louisiana.

ENGL BC3252 Contemporary Media Theory. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. Enrollment limited to 18 students. Attend first class for instructor permission. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.

Explores the transformation of sociality, consciousness and geo-politics by and as media technologies during the long 20th century. Students will read influential works of media analysis written during the past century, analyze audio-visual analog and digital media, and explore political theory and media theory written since the rise of the internet. Final projects on contemporary media forms.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3252
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3252 001/03975 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
501 Diana Center
Jonathan Beller 4 12/18

AFEN BC3525 Atlantic Crossings: The West Indies and the Atlantic World. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students.

This course examines the literature of transatlantic travel from Columbus's first voyage in 1492 to Caryl Phillips’s re-tracing of his mother's migration in The Atlantic Sound (2000) to recent re-imaginings of slavery and the Middle Passage by M. Nourbese Philip and Marlon James. Even before Columbus's first encounter, the "Indies" sparked English desires for riches and adventure. We will first investigate how English writers promoted an idea of the West Indies and then came to inhabit its heterogeneous spaces, filling them with longing and anxiety. The class will chart the emergence of modern race thinking from the rich interaction of peoples and goods in the early modern Caribbean. We will also question how ideals of freedom and "English-ness" co-existed with slavery, bondage and creole life. The class will then look at the ways later writers revisit the Caribbean's colonial origins and discuss how notions of the West Indies may haunt modern Atlantic travel.

ENRE BC3810 Literary Approaches to the Bible. 4 points.

Interpretive strategies for reading the Bible as a work with literary dimensions. Considerations of poetic and rhetorical structures, narrative techniques, and feminist exegesis will be included. Topics for investigation include the influence of the Bible on literature.

Spring 2017: ENRE BC3810
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENRE 3810 001/00952 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
530 Altschul Hall
Margaret Ellsberg 4 12/12

AFEN BC3815 The Worlds of Ntozake Shange and Digital Storytelling. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 12 students. Permission of the instructor required. Interested students should complete the application at: http://bit.ly/ShangeWorlds. Students should have taken a course beyond the intro level from ONE of the following areas: American Literature (through the English Department), Africana Studies, American Studies, Theatre or Women's Studies. Please note that this is a yearlong course; students who are accepted into this course will need to take its second half, AFEN BC3816, in the spring semester.

A poet, performance artist, playwright and novelist, Ntozake Shange's stylistic innovations in drama, poetry and fiction and attention to the untold lives of black women have made her an influential figure throughout American arts and in Feminist history. In a unique collaboration between Barnard, the Schomburg Center for Black Culture and the International Center for Photography, and with support by the Mellon funded "Barnard Teaches" grant, this year long seminar provides an in-depth exploration of Shange's work and milieu as well as an introduction to digital tools, public research and archival practice. You can find more information and apply for the course at http://bit.ly/ShangeWorlds. On Twitter @ShangeWorlds.

AFEN BC3816 The Worlds of Ntozake Shange and Digital Storytelling. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: AFEN BC3815 or equivalent.

This hands-on, project based course introduces students to the use of digital tools and sources to organize and manage their archival research, interpret their findings and communicate their results to the public. This semester, the course is somewhat different than the usual research course in that, rather than simply going more deeply into the course focus, you will be asked to apply your knowledge to make new things. With support of a Mellon "Barnard Teaches" grant we will continue to work with our archival partners and with experts at the International Center for Photography (ICP) to help you develop projects that teach some aspect of Shange's work and/or The Black Arts Movement to a larger audience. But while making these new things, we will have ongoing discussions about the nature of and evolving protocols for digital scholarship. You should be making plans to visit the archive appropriate to your project (in most cases this will be the Schomburg or the Barnard archives, but they might include sites such as The Billy Rose Theatre Division at the NYPL or the Amiri Baraka collection at Columbia University) as well as doing background reading for your project. Unlike last semester's blogging, which focused on developing an interdisciplinary reading practice, this semester you will blog about your research. Every week you should be blogging about your reading or your research: every two weeks your blogpost will be an "archive find of the week" post that highlights an interesting image, document or object discovered in your chosen archive (see assignments sheet for details). You might find it more pleasant (and better for our short-staffed archives) to visit the archive or ICP in small groups. To attain the technical skills necessary to make things, you may sometimes be asked to inform and educate yourself outside of class, using extracurricular resources. Be prepared for some DIY moments throughout the semester. By the end of the semester, you'll have sharpened your research skills while also acquiring digital, teamwork, and project management skills that will be useful in other classes and beyond.

ENGL BC3993 The Worlds of Shange. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students. Permission of the instructor required. Interested students should complete this form: http://bit.ly/1aCNoQW Students should have taken a course beyond the intro level from ONE of the following areas: American Literature (through the English Department), Africana Studies, American Studies, Theatre or Women's Studies.

This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of the work of Ntozake Shange. A poet, performance artist, playwright and novelist, Shange's stylistic innovations in drama, poetry and fiction and attention to the untold lives of black women have made her an influential figure throughout American arts. We will examine Shange's work in relationship to the Black Arts Movement and Black Feminist thought as well as from multidisciplinary perspectives. Texts will include Shange's for colored girls who have considered suicide when the rainbow is enuf; If I can cook, you know God can; Sassafrass, Cypress and Indigo and Spell #7. These works will be partnered with significant related texts such as Adrienne Kennedy's Funny House of a Negro and Michelle Wallace, Black Macho and the Myth of the Superwoman.

ENGL BC3901 Sr. Sem: The Field of the Emotions in Romantic Literature and the Arts, Psychoanalysis, Affective Neuroscience, and Philosophy. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Sign up through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to senior Barnard English majors.

An interdisciplinary examination of human feelings, emotions, and passions, with a focus on the romantic era (the poetry of Keats & Shelley, Beethoven's 9th symphony, Turner's paintings), in coordination with more scientific approaches to these phenomena in affective neuroscience (Jaak Panksepp), psychoanalysis (selected Lacan, references to Freud) and philosophy (excerpts and references to Aristotle, Hume, Hegel, & Schiller). A feeling, an emotion, an affect is something that comes into existence or happens or that shows itself (Greek Phainein=to show) without our knowing exactly what it is, what caused it, or what it is "showing" or "saying." How have these phenomena and their function been interpreted? What do we at this point know, how does this compare to earlier speculations, and what should or can we try to do with our emotions and passions?

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3901
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3901 001/06130 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
117 Barnard Hall
Maire Jaanus 4 10/12

ENGL BC3902 Sr. Sem: Adultery: Realism and Desire in Fiction and Film. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Sign up through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior Film majors and Barnard senior English majors with Film concentration.

"Rising from the most basic human needs, marriage is essential to our most profound hopes and aspirations."  So writes the United States Supreme Court in Obergefell v. Hodges (2015), finding in marriage the "keystone of our social order" - the means by which individual desire is stably fixed within the family unit and, thereby, linked to civility and law.  This course studies a rich counter-tradition of film and literature interested in adultery.  These works suggest ways in which human desire and identity exceed social bounds; they also examine ways in which private desire is not only limited but formed by social forces.  Works may include: fiction by Flaubert, Goethe, James, Laclos, Proust, Tolstoy; films by Frears, Kieslowski, Renoir, Resnais, Wilder, Wong; criticism and philosophy by Barthes, Beauvoir, Cavell, Cott, Freud, Hegel, Marx.

ENGL BC3903 Sr. Sem: Poets in Correspondence. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Sign up through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to senior Barnard English majors.

(Formerly ENGL BC3997; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) How do poets' letters inform our understanding of their poetry? From the eighteenth to the twentieth century, poets have used their intimate correspondence to "baffle absence," as Coleridge remarked. This course will examine the ways several masters of the letter (including Cowper, Keats, Dickinson, Eliot, Bishop, and Lowell, among others) shaped their prose to convey spontaneity in paradoxically artful ways, illuminating their major work as poets and making the private letter a literary form in its own right.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3903
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3903 001/01676 T 11:00am - 12:50pm
117 Barnard Hall
Saskia Hamilton 4 15/14

ENGL BC3904 Charles Dickens. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Sign up through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to senior Barnard English majors.

(Formerly ENGL BC3997; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) Charles Dickens: the life, the works, the legend, in as much detail as we can manage in one semester. Reading will be selected by the class, and may include Pickwick Papers, A Christmas Carol, David Copperfield, Bleak House, and selections from his friend John Forster's Life of Charles Dickens.. Special emphasis will be given to the question of what "Dickensian" means, in the context of Dickens's literary style, his genius for characterization, his love of conviviality, and Victorian extremes of wealth and poverty. . Students will be expected to share in creating the syllabus, presenting new material, and leading class discussion. 

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3904
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3904 001/05804 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
530 Altschul Hall
William Sharpe 4 10/12

ENGL BC3905 Sr. Sem: Amazing Grace: English and American Antislavery Literature. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Sign up through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to senior Barnard English majors.

Drawing on poems, plays, slave narratives, fiction and other genres, by both famous and non-canonical writers from 1660 to 1865, this seminar explores the ways that writers helped end slavery. Authors include Defoe, Johnson, Wheatley, Equiano, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Longfellow, Alcott, Stowe, Douglass, Melville, and Harriet Jacobs, among others. Final projects may take the form of extended critical essays or original anthologies.

ENGL BC3906 Sr. Sem: Black Literature Now. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Sign up through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to senior Barnard English majors.

(Formerly ENGL BC3997; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) Examines contemporary African American literature, in particular the ways in which recent authors are reconceiving literary notions of blackness. Beginning in the 1980s with the emergence of "post-soul" literature, this class explores the ways in which authors one or two generations after the Civil Rights Movement reconfigure their sense of racial "belonging" and notions of how to write "blackness" into a text. Authors may include Ellis, Whitehead, Southgate, Everett, Senna, Sapphire, Beatty, Toure, Packer, Johnson and Morrison.

ENGL BC3907 Sr. Sem: Short Fiction by American Women. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Sign up through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to senior Barnard English majors.

(Formerly ENGL BC3997; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) We will explore the rich variety of fiction in shorter forms--short stories and novellas--written by American women. Writers to be studied will include Porter, Stafford, Welty, O'Connor, Olsen, Paley.

ENGL BC3908 Sr. Sem: The American Sublime. 4 points.

(Formerly ENGL BC3998; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) "The empty spirit / In vacant space": gothicism, transcendentalism, and postmodern rapture. Traces of the sublime in the American literary landscape, featuring Poe, Melville, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, Stevens, Bishop, Didion, and Robinson.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3908
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3908 001/04353 W 11:00am - 12:50pm
404 Barnard Hall
Margaret Vandenburg 4 11/10

ENGL BC3909 Sr. Sem: The Family in Fiction & Film: The Poetics of Growing Up. 4 points.

(Formerly ENGL BC3998; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) Looking closely at late Twentieth and Twenty-First Century stories, novels, memoir and films that center on the logic, dysfunction, romance, system, morphing, divorcing and curious maturation of the family. From Alison Bechdel's graphic novel, Fun Home, to the Korean film, The Host, we will explore fresh and a few classic cinematic takes on this theme. We will explore renderings of "family cultures," family feeling, family values, the family as a narrative configuration, and home as a utopian space, a nightmarish landscape, a memory palace and more. Authors and directors will include: Wes Anderson, Gaston Bachelard, Mira Bartok, Alison Bechdel, Joon-ho Bong, Jonathan Franzen, Vivien Gornick, Lasse Hallstrom, Tamara Jenkins, Ang Lee, Mike Leigh, Jim, Sheridan, Todd Solondz, Francois Truffaut, Tennessee Williams, D. W. Winnicott, Andrei Zvyagintsev.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3909
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3909 001/02320 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
404 Barnard Hall
Maura Spiegel 4 7/10

ENGL BC3910 Sr. Sem: Sexuality, Sin, and Spirituality. 4 points.

(Formerly ENGL BC3997; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) The first half of the course is grounded in readings from Bible, Augustine, Petrarch and Donne, but the second half with move to later texts including Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, and Flannery O'Connor stories. We will discuss as a class other texts we might want to add.  For their senior essays, students will come up with their own topics and may explore the relation and intersection between sexuality, sin, and spirituality up into the present, and cross-culturally.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3910
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3910 001/02193 T 12:00pm - 1:50pm
406 Barnard Hall
Achsah Guibbory 4 7/10

ENGL BC3911 Sr. Sem: Write to Vote. 4 points.

This seminar investigates the literary antecedents and cultural aftermath of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, with special attention to gendered and racial narratives of the ballot. Authors include Walt Whitman, Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Thomas Dixon, Jr., William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Fannie Lou Hamer and Alice Walker.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3911
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3911 001/00133 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
501 Diana Center
Jennie Kassanoff 4 11/12

ENGL BC3912 Sr. Sem: Utopias and Dystopias. 4 points.

(Formerly ENGL BC3998; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) A look first at Thomas More’s Utopia and then at the dreams or nightmares it inspired, whether hopeful, ironic, serious, parodic, speculative, nightmarish, or simply interrogatory. Authors include More, Rabelais, Bacon, Margaret Cavendish, William Morris, Bellamy, H.G. Wells, George Orwell, Ursula LeGuin and, if there is time, R.A. Lafferty’s scifi novel starring More and also a young adult novel by Lois Lowry.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3912
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3912 001/06866 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
406 Barnard Hall
Anne Prescott 4 8/10

ENGL BC3913 Sr. Sem: Human and Other Animal Identities. 4 points.

(Formerly ENGL BC3998; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) In this seminar, we will engage in an interdisciplinary study of intersections of human and non-human animal identities in selected literary, philosophical and theoretical texts. We will examine how constructions and representations of non-human animal identities confirm understandings and experiences of human ones, including racialized and gendered identities and study the ways in which non-human identities challenge claims to human exceptionalism. Some of the topics along which the readings will be arranged include liminality, (mis)-recognition, metamorphoses, suffering, as well as love. Readings include Aristotle, Euripides, Ovid, Montaigne, Descartes, Shakespeare, Kafka, Woolf, Morrison, Coetzee, Szymborska, Hughes, Haraway, and Derrida and essays by contemporary scholars such as Kim Hall and Karl Steel. Some class time will be devoted to the process of writing the thesis at all significant critical junctures.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3913
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3913 001/04674 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
403 Barnard Hall
Timea Szell 4 8/10

ENGL BC3914 Sr. Sem: Exploring the 18th Century. 4 points.

This seminar will explore selected topics in the 18th century, including the transformation in print culture and development of new genres such as the novel, biography, and popular journalism; the emergence of women writers; the interplay between canonical authors and newcomers such as working class and Black writers; the literature of slavery and abolition; poetic experimentation; and the turn to Romanticism. Writers include Behn, Defoe, Pope, Johnson, Richardson, Sterne, Wheatley, Blake, Cowper, Equiano, Boswell, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, and Austen. Students will be invited to propose additional writers for our weekly discussions and to include in their projects writers beyond the syllabus.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3914
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3914 001/00656 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
117 Barnard Hall
James Basker 4 8/12

ENGL BC3915 Sr. Sem: Late Shakespeare: Visions and Revisions. 4 points.

Shakespeare’s last plays as both experimental and re-visionary. Topics will include aesthetics, philosophy, politics, sexuality, and gender, as well as post-1950 literary criticism’s reconstruction of these final plays. Probable texts: Othello, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3915
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3915 001/08478 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
117 Barnard Hall
Peter Platt 4 10/12

ENGL G3995 Reading Lacan. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

FALL 2013 - An intensive reading of selections from Lacan’s Seminar VI: Desire and Its Interpretation with Shakespeare’s Hamlet; Seminar VII: The Ethics of Psychoanalysis with Sophocles’s Antigone; Seminar VIII: The Transference with Plato’s Symposium; and Seminar XX: Encore: On Feminine Sexuality: The Limits of Love and Knowledge with Clarice Lispector and Marguerite Duras. Emphasis on the relevance of Lacan's thought to contemporary literature, culture, and neuroscience, and to questions about happiness, democracy, and peace.

ENGL BC3996 Special Project in Theatre, Writing, or Critical Interpretation. 1 point.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Chair required. In rare cases, the English Department Chair may permit an English major not concentrating in theatre or writing to take ENGL BC3996 in combination with another course.

Senior majors who are concentrating in Theatre or Writing and have completed two courses in writing or three in theatre will normally take the Special Project in Theatre or Writing (ENGL BC 3996 x or y) in combination with an additional course in their special field. This counts in place of one of the Senior Seminars. In certain cases, Independent Study (ENGL BC 3999 - see below) may be substituted for the Special Project.

ENGL BC3999 Independent Study. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Department Chair.

Senior majors who wish to substitute Independent Study for one of the two required senior seminars should consult the chair. Permission is given rarely and only to students who present a clear and well-defined topic of study, who have a department sponsor, and who submit their proposals well in advance of the semester in which they will register. There is no independent study for screenwriting or film production.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3999
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3999 004/09289  
Pamela Cobrin 4 12

Cross-Listed Courses

FILM BC3119 Screenwriting. 3 points.

Prerequisites: FILM BC3201 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 12 students. Priority is given to Film Studies majors/concentrations in order of class seniority.
Corequisites: (Since this is a Film course, it does not count as a writing course for English majors with a Writing Concentration.)

Practical workshop in dramatic writing for the screen. Through exercises and games specifically catered to the writing of scenes and concrete scene work, students explore and develop an understanding for the basic principles of screenwriting, learn how to find the right form and structure for each story, and how to achieve thematic richness, emotional depth, and narrative rhythm. By the end of the class students will have written a 10-12 page short and/or have material for the development of a feature screenplay.

Spring 2017: FILM BC3119
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3119 001/03301 W 10:00am - 12:50pm
324 Milbank Hall
Christina Kallas 3 13/0
Fall 2017: FILM BC3119
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3119 001/02599 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
407 Barnard Hall
Rubeintz Philippe 3 13/12

FILM BC3120 Feature Film Screenwriting. 3 points.

Prerequisites: FILM BC3201 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 12 students. Priority is given to Film Studies majors/concentrations in order of class seniority.
Corequisites: (Since this is a Film course, it does not count as a writing course for English majors with a Writing Concentration.)

Workshop in feature film writing. Students will enter the course with a story idea, ready to start a feature screenplay. Through lectures and workshop discussions, the course will critique the details of character development and scene construction. Analysis of student work will prompt generalized conversations/lectures on the fundamentals of film writing. Emphasis will be placed on character as the engine of story.

Spring 2017: FILM BC3120
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3120 001/02438 M 4:10pm - 7:00pm
325 Milbank Hall
Rubeintz Philippe 3 12/0

FILM BC3201 Introduction to Film and Media Studies. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART)., Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: Open to first-year students.
Corequisites: Enroll in the required Discussion Section through FILM BC 3204: Discussion Section.

Introductory survey of the history, aesthetics and theories of film. Topics in American and International cinema are explored through weekly screenings, readings, discussion, and lecture. A complete introduction to cinema studies, this course is also the prerequisite for further film courses at Columbia and Barnard.

Fall 2017: FILM BC3201
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3201 001/02089 W 12:00pm - 1:50pm
323 Milbank Hall
Christina Kallas 3 46/60
FILM 3201 001/02089 M 6:00pm - 9:00pm
202 Milbank Hall
Christina Kallas 3 46/60