Athena Center for Leadership Studies

Vagelos Alumnae Center
212-854-1264
646-810-3944 (fax)
athenacenter.barnard.edu
Director: Kathryn Kolbert
Administrative Assistant: Belinda Hamer

Mission

The Athena Center for Leadership Studies was created to explore how women lead and how gender affects leadership styles and strategies. Its interdisciplinary, innovative undergraduate program, the Athena Scholars Program, combines rigorous academic and experiential study which help students prepare to assume positions of leadership at the highest levels of achievement.

Athena Scholars Program

Barnard students of any major may participate in the Athena Scholars Program; the declaration of intent must be filed by the Spring of sophomore year. Participation in the Athena program does not constitute a major. Rather, completion of the program is typically done in conjunction with the College’s general educational and the student’s major requirements. Students who complete the program receive recognition on their transcripts indicating their standing as an Athena Leadership Scholar. Special opportunities, including fellowships and mentoring, are available to Athena Scholars.

Student Developmental Goals

The Athena Scholars Program aspires to develop leaders who are:

  • Visionary
  • Courageous and resilient
  • Bold and innovative
  • Globally aware and culturally sensitive
  • Determined to make the world a better place

Athena leaders embrace diversity and encourage other women to lead.

Student Learning Outcomes

Athena Scholars Program participants will develop and enhance the above developmental goals through the following learning objectives:

  • Identify and communicate the importance of women’s leadership to an increasingly global, diverse and interconnected world.
  • Think and write critically about gendered institutions, theories, and strategies, and how they affect leadership.
  • Integrate theoretical frameworks on women and leadership with skills learned in the Athena Leadership Lab while completing an internship.
  • Interpret the historical, social, economic and cultural influences that have shaped, and continue to shape, women’s advancement, including (but not limited to) politics, family, business, and social reform.
  • Apply concepts or methods from more than one social science, humanities, or adjacent discipline to analyze gendered leadership styles and strategies.
  • Communicate ideas effectively in writing and oral presentations.
  • Design, execute and present a social action project.

Faculty Advisory Committee: Alexander Cooley (Political Science), Alan Dye (Economics), Ross Hamilton (English and Film Studies), Kimberley Johnson (Political Science and Urban Studies), Brian Mailloux (Environmental Science), Robert McCaughey (History), Debra Minkoff (Sociology), Rae Silver (Natural and Physical Sciences), David Weiman (Economics), and Page West (Anthropology)

Requirements

  1. Women and Leadership Course (ACLS BC3450 Women and Leadership): Students ideally take this class their sophomore or junior year.
  2. Athena Senior Leadership Seminar (ACLS BC3997 Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar/ACLS BC3998 Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar): Student can take this course either the Fall or Spring semester of their senior year; a main component of this class is the completion of a social action project which demonstrates leadership skills in an off-campus setting. 
  3. Three Electives Courses: Students choose three elective courses from Athena’s multi-disciplinary course offerings. The electives must be from at least 2 of the 3 groups: the study of organizations and institutions; the study of gender; and presentation skill courses.  Elective courses may also be counted as credit toward one's major. The complete listing of approved courses is below.
  4. Practicum: Students must partake in an approved practicum during the school year or summer.  A student’s practicum should relate to their post-undergraduate goals, including academic research for a professor, supervised laboratory work, and/or an internship.   Practicums in all fields are welcome, and should uphold the leadership developmental goals of the Athena Center.  Students submit a written reflection in the Senior Leadership Seminar.
  5. Athena Leadership Lab Workshops: Students must complete three workshops of their choosing.  For workshop selection, see Athena Leadership Lab.

Approved Elective Courses

Group A: The Study of Institutions and Organizations

Africana Studies
AFRS BC3055Slave Resistance in the United States from the Colonial Era to the Civil War
Chemistry
CHEM BC2900Research Methods Seminar
CHEM BC3328Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Economics
ECON BC2075Logic and Limits of Economic Justice
ECON BC3011Inequality and Poverty
ECON BC3014Entrepreneurship
ECON BC3017Economics of Business Organization
ECON BC3019Labor Economics
ECON BC3029Empirical Development Economics
Education
EDUC BC3032Contemporary Issues in Education
Environmental Science
EESC BC3019Energy Resources
EESC BC3300Workshop in Sustainable Development
History
HIST BC2664Reproducing Inequalities: Families in Latin American History
HIST BC3323The City in Europe
HIST BC3901Reacting to the Past II
Human Rights
HRTS BC1025Human Rights in Theory and Practice
Political Science
POLS BC3300* Colloquium on Political Participation and Democracy
POLS BC3331* Colloquium on American Political Decisionmaking
POLS BC3332* Colloquium on Exploring Political Leadership in the U.S.
POLS BC3521Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
POLS BC3805*Colloquium on International Organization
POLS V3313American Urban Politics
POLS V3615Globalization and International Politics
POLS V3675Russia and the West
POLS W4316The American Presidency
Psychology
PSYC BC1136Social Psychology
PSYC BC1138Social Psychology
PSYC BC2151Organizational Psychology
PSYC BC3166Social Conflict
PSYC BC3364Psychology of Leadership
Religion
RELI V3650Religion and the Civil Rights Movement
RELI W4610Science, Nature, and Religion in 20th Century America
RELI W4670Native American Religions
RELI W4721Religion and Social Justice
Science and Public Policy
SCPP BC3335Environmental Leadership, Ethics & Action
Sociology
SOCI BC3907Communities and Social Change
SOCI BC3909Ethnic Conflict and Unrest
SOCI BC3913Inequalities: Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in U.S. Law and Society
SOCI BC3935Gender and Organizations
SOCI W3675Organizing Innovation
SOCI V3324Poverty, Inequality, and Policy: A Sociological Perspective
SOCI W3936Sociology and the Public
Urban Studies
URBS V3530Urban Development: A Rubik's Cube of Policy Choices
URBS V3550Community Building and Economic Development
URBS V3920Social Entrepreneurship
Women's Studies
WMST V3312Theorizing Activism

Group B: The Study of Gender

Africana Studies
AFRS BC3121Black Women in America
AFRS BC3589Black Feminism(s)/Womanism(s)
Anthropology
ANTH V3465Women and Gender Politics in the Muslim World (x)
Art History
AHIS BC3123Woman and Art (y)
AHIS BC39571980s Feminism and Postmodernism in the Visual Arts
Classical Civilization
CLCV V3158Women in Antiquity
Economics
ECON BC2010The Economics of Gender
History
HIST BC2567Women, Gender and Sexuality in the 20th Century U.S.
HIST BC2681Women and Gender in Latin America
HIST BC2803Gender and Empire
HIST BC2865Gender and Power in China
HIST BC3870Gender and Migration: A Global Perspective
HIST BC3879Feminist Traditions in China
HIST BC3999Transnational Feminism
History-East Asian
HSEA W4888Woman and Gender in Korean History
Music
MUSI V3462Music, Gender and Performance
Philosophy
PHIL UN2110Philosophy and Feminism
Political Science
POLS BC3402The Comparative Politics of Gender Inequality
Psychology
PSYC BC3153Psychology and Women
PSYC BC3379Psychology of Stereotyping and Prejudice
Sociology
SOCI BC3903Work and Culture
SOCI UN3235Social Movements: Collective Action
SOCI UN3264The Changing American Family
SOCI V3220Masculinity: A Sociological View
SOCI V3318The Sociology of Sexuality
SOCI W3265Sociology of Work and Gender
SOCI UN3302Sociology of Gender
Women's Studies
WMST BC3131Women and Science
WMST UN1001Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
WMST UN3915Gender and Power in Transnational Perspective
WMST W4300Advanced Topics in Women's and Gender Studies
WMST W4301Early Jewish Women Immigrant Writers: 1900-1939
WMST W4303Gender, Globalization, and Empire
WMST W4304Gender and HIV/AIDS
WMST W4307Sexuality and the Law
WMST W4308Sexuality and Science
WMST W4309Sex, Gender and Transgender Queries
WMST W4320Queer Theories and Histories

Group C: Presentation Skills

Dance
DNCE BC2563Composition: Form, Dance/Theater
DNCE BC3565Composition: Collaboration and the Creative Process
DNCE BC3577Performing the Political: Embodying Change in American Performance
DNCE BC3583Gender and Historical Memory in American Dance of the 1930's to the Early 1960's
DNCE BC3980Performing the Political: Embodying Change in American Performance
English
ENGL BC3106Fiction and Personal Narrative
ENGL BC3121Public Speaking
ENGL BC3123Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking
ENGL BC3196Home to Harlem: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance
English Theatre
ENTH BC3140Women and Theatre
ENTH BC3144Black Theatre
Music
MUSI BC3139Introduction to Vocal Repertoire: Technique in Singing and Performance
MUSI BC3140Vocal Repertoire, Technique and Expression
Theatre
THTR UN2005Acting Workshop
THTR UN3140Performing Women

ACLS BC3450 Women and Leadership. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Limited to 15.

  Examination of the social conditions and linguistic practices that have shaped the historical and contemporary gendering of leadership, power, and authority in the United States and around the world. Through examples drawn from the social, political, and economic worlds, we will explore leadership in varying racial, class, and regional contexts.

Spring 2017: ACLS BC3450
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ACLS 3450 001/04851 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
502 Diana Center
Heather Hurwitz 4 17
ACLS 3450 002/06901 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
502 Diana Center
Natascia Boeri 4 23
Fall 2017: ACLS BC3450
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ACLS 3450 001/09891 T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
502 Diana Center
Heather Hurwitz 4 13
ACLS 3450 002/01484 Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
501 Diana Center
Skye Cleary 4 16

ACLS BC3997 Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: ACLS BC3450. Enrollment limited to Barnard seniors participating in the Athena Scholars Program.

Limited to seniors participating in the Athena Scholars Program.   Students will develop a social action project where they must demonstrate leadership skills in an off-campus setting.  Students will be expected to develop and implement a detailed plan to start their project.  Then they will collaborate with other class members to advance their projects, report to their peers on their accomplishments and have an opportunity to work closely with organizations across the city on their efforts. 

Fall 2017: ACLS BC3997
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ACLS 3997 001/02742 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
501 Diana Center
Kathryn Kolbert 4 25

ACLS BC3998 Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: ACLS BC3450. Enrollment limited to Barnard seniors participating in the Athena Scholars Program

Limited to seniors participating in the Athena Scholars Program. Students will develop a social action project where they must demonstrate leadership skills in an off-campus setting. Students will be expected to develop and implement a detailed plan to start their project. Then they will collaborate with other class members to advance their projects, report to their peers on their accomplishments and have an opportunity to work closely with organizations across the city on their efforts.

Spring 2017: ACLS BC3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ACLS 3998 001/09746 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
202 Milbank Hall
Kathryn Kolbert 4 20

Cross-Listed Courses

Africana Studies (Barnard)

AFRS BC3055 Slave Resistance in the United States from the Colonial Era to the Civil War. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Analyzes the multifaceted nature of slave resistance, its portrayal and theorization by scholars.  Critically examines the various pathways of resistance of enslaved Africans and African-Americans, both individually and collectively (e.g., running away, non-cooperation, theft, arson, as well as verbal and physical confrontation, revolts and insurrections).  Considers how gender shaped acts of resistance.

AFRS BC3121 Black Women in America. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then. Priority will be given to CCIS students (Africana Studies, American Studies and Women's Studies majors; minors in Race and Ethnic Studies). Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Examines the roles of black women in the U.S. as thinkers, activists and creators during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Focusing on the intellectual work, social activism and cultural expression of African American women, we examine how they understood their lives, resisted oppression and struggled to change society. We will also discuss theoretical frameworks (such as "double jeopardy," or "intersectionality") developed for the study of black women. The seminar will encourage students to pay particular attention to the diversity of black women and critical issues facing Black women today. This course is the same as WMST BC3121.

AFRS BC3589 Black Feminism(s)/Womanism(s). 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Black Feminism(s)/Womanism(s)

Spring 2017: AFRS BC3589
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AFRS 3589 001/08835 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
502 Diana Center
Celia Naylor 4 19

Anthropology (Barnard)

ANTH V3465 Women and Gender Politics in the Muslim World. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Practices like veiling that are central to Western images of women and Islam are also contested issues throughout the Muslim world. Examines debates about Islam and gender and explores the interplay of cultural, political, and economic factors in shaping women's lives in the Muslim world, from the Middle East to Southeast Asia.

Art History (Barnard)

AHIS BC3123 Woman and Art. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Discussion of the methods necessary to analyze visual images of women in their historical, racial, and class contexts, and to understand the status of women as producers, patrons, and audiences of art and architecture.

AHIS BC3957 1980s Feminism and Postmodernism in the Visual Arts. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: AHIS BC1001 - AHIS BC1002 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 15 students. Permission of the instructor. Preference to seniors and Art History majors.

Examination of art and criticism that is informed by feminist and postmodern ideas about subjectivity in visual representation which first achieved prominence in the late 1970s and 1980s, exerting a profound influence on contemporary aesthetic practice. Explored in relation to earlier concepts of feminism, modernism, social art history, and "art as institution." Artworks discussed include those of Barbara Kruger, Cindy Sherman, Louise Lawler, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Hans Haacke, Mary Kelly, and Catherine Opie, among others.

Chemistry

CHEM BC2900 Research Methods Seminar. 1 point.

Instructor's Permission Required

Prerequisites: Students must be sophomores with a strong interest in pursuing research in the biological or chemical sciences

Skills to facilitate into biology and chemistry research. Students will learn to think and work like scientists and to identify, apply for and gain entry to research lab groups. Focus on writing and oral presentation skills. Additional readings and discussions on laboratory safety, women in science, and scientific ethics.

Spring 2017: CHEM BC2900
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 2900 001/05521 Th 1:10pm - 2:00pm
308 Diana Center
Jennifer Mansfield 1 8

CHEM BC3328 Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 2.5 points.

Prerequisites: (CHEM BC3230) General Chemistry I with lab.

Basic techniques of experimental organic chemistry. Principles and methods of separation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. Selected organic reactions.

,

Friday 1:10 - 5:30PM

Classical Civilization

CLCV V3158 Women in Antiquity. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

Examines the role of women in ancient Greek and Latin literature; the portrayal of women in literature as opposed to their actual social status; male and female in ancient Mediterranean cosmologies; readings from ancient epics, lyric drama, history, historical documents, medical texts, oratory, and philosophy, as well as from contemporary sociological and anthropological works that help to analyze the origins of the Western attitude toward women.

Dance (Barnard)

DNCE BC2563 Composition: Form, Dance/Theater. 3 points.

 An exploration of choreography that employs text, song, vocal work, narrative and principles of artistic direction in solo and group contexts.

Spring 2017: DNCE BC2563
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
DNCE 2563 001/08349 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
11 Barnard Hall
Gabri Christa 3 45

DNCE BC3565 Composition: Collaboration and the Creative Process. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Dance Composition: Form (DNCE BC 2563) or Dance Composition: Content (DNCE BC 2564), or permission of the instructor.

This course is a study in dance composition with a focus on collaboration.  Whether creating a solo or larger group piece, students are encouraged to collaborate with other artists. Methods employed by contemporary choreographers will be explored.  Peer feedback and creative dialogue will be a component of every class.

DNCE BC3577 Performing the Political: Embodying Change in American Performance. 3 points.

Exploration into the politics of performance and the performance of politics.

DNCE BC3583 Gender and Historical Memory in American Dance of the 1930's to the Early 1960's. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: One course in dance history/studies or permission of the instructor.

Explores the question of why so many women dancer/choreographers of the 1930's - to the early 1960's, including relatively well-known ones, have ended up as peripheral rather than central players in what has become the master narrative of a crucial era of the recent dance past.

DNCE BC3980 Performing the Political: Embodying Change in American Performance. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: An introductory course in dance or theatre history or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 12 students.

Exploration into the politics of performance and the performance of politics through the lens of 20th-century American dance.

Economics (Barnard)

ECON BC2010 The Economics of Gender. 3 points.

Examination of gender differences in the U.S. and other advanced industrial economies. Topics include the division of labor between home and market, the relationship between labor force participation and family structure, the gender earnings gap, occupational segregation, discrimination, and historical, racial, and ethnic group comparisons.

Spring 2017: ECON BC2010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 2010 001/05588 T Th 5:40pm - 6:55pm
304 Barnard Hall
Homa Zarghamee 3 99/100

ECON BC2075 Logic and Limits of Economic Justice. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Economic Reasoning (ECON BC 1003) or Principles of Economics (ECON W1105). An introductory course in political theory or political philosophy is strongly recommended, but not required.

Introduce students to problems of economic justice under capitalism.  Course has three goals: (1) expose students to debates between economics and philosophers about the meaning and nature of justice, (2) explore conflict between efficiency and justice, (3) examine implications of justice for gender equality, intergenerational equity and climate change.

ECON BC3011 Inequality and Poverty. 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033, or permission of the instructor.

Conceptualization and measurement of inequality and poverty, poverty traps and distributional dynamics, economics and politics of public policies, in both poor and rich countries.

ECON BC3014 Entrepreneurship. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035, or ECON BC3033, or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

Examines theoretical, empirical, and normative studies of entrepreneurial behavior and its significance. Examines their relationships with risk-taking and innovation. Explores entrepreneurship as applicable to a variety of behaviors, activities or contexts, including large organizations, small business networks, new venture creation, comparative financial institutions that support entrepreneurial environments, and entrepreneurship's contributions to a dynamic economy.

ECON BC3017 Economics of Business Organization. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035 or permission of the instructor.

Economics of firm organization and the evolution of the modern business enterprise. The function of organizations in coordinating the use of economic resources. The role of technology, labor, management, and markets in the formation of the business enterprise. Includes international comparisons and attention to alternative economic theories on the role of business organizations on national competitive advantage.

ECON BC3019 Labor Economics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: ECON BC3035, or permission of the instructor.

Factors affecting the allocation and remuneration of labor; population structure; unionization and monopsony; education and training, mobility and information; sex and race discrimination; unemployment; and public policy.

Fall 2017: ECON BC3019
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3019 001/08324 T Th 6:10pm - 7:25pm
302 Barnard Hall
Lalith Munasinghe 3 25/50

ECON BC3029 Empirical Development Economics. 3 points.

Prerequisites: (ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033) and ECON UN3412 ECON BC3035 or ECON BC3033 and Econometrics, or permission of the instructor.

Examination of new challenges in the global economy from unequal income distribution and poor institutions to health epidemics and natural disasters. Accessing and analyzing real-time and historic data to understand the current global economy.  Applied econometric techniques.

Spring 2017: ECON BC3029
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3029 001/02949 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
903 Altschul Hall
Anja Tolonen 3 29/40

Education

EDUC BC3032 Contemporary Issues in Education. 4 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Course enrollment will be determined after the first class meeting; application is available on CourseWorks.,,Open to all students; preference given to Urban Teaching, Education Studies and Urban Studies students.

Contemporary Issues in Education is an introduction to the range of intellectual dilemmas that are a part of American schooling through the illumination of the various social, philosophical, economic, and institutional forces that shape the learning environment. The topics serve to promote critical thought of educational dilemmas stemming from issues such as power and authority, the intersection of race, gender, socio-economic inequity, and challenges that confront students such as identity, marginalization and resiliency. This course is open to all students interested in investigating one’s best “fit” in the education realm, which may include classroom teaching, educational policy, reform, and NGO-based involvement.

Spring 2017: EDUC BC3032
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EDUC 3032 001/06110 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Ll104 Diana Center
Kelly Zuckerman 4 24/24
Fall 2017: EDUC BC3032
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EDUC 3032 001/03742 M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
214 Milbank Hall
Thea Abu El-Haj 4 15/24

English

ENGL BC3106 Fiction and Personal Narrative. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

In this workshop we will read risky and urgent examples of life writing, from autobiographical fiction to radical and poetic memoir and essay. Some writers we could be reading include Claudia Rankine, Lydia Davis, Hervé Guibert, Chris Kraus, and others. I hope to help you push your texts to their vibrant full potential. We will also be developing an innovative vocabulary to describe the work you're reading and writing. Open to anyone willing to read, write, and rewrite adventurously.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3106
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3106 001/07418 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
405 Barnard Hall
Katie Zambreno 3 12

ENGL BC3121 Public Speaking. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students. Open only to undergraduates, preference to seniors and juniors. Attend first class for instructor permission. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.

This course will introduce you to principles of effective public speaking and debate, and provide practical opportunities to use these principles in structured speaking situations. You will craft and deliver speeches, engage in debates and panel discussions, analyze historical and contemporary speakers, and reflect on your own speeches and those of your classmates. You will explore and practice different rhetorical strategies with an emphasis on information, persuasion and argumentation. For each speaking assignment, you will go through the speech-making process, from audience analysis, purpose and organization, to considerations of style and delivery. The key criteria in this course are content, organization, and adaptation to the audience and purpose. While this is primarily a performance course, you will be expected to participate extensively as a listener and critic, as well as a speaker.

Spring 2017: ENGL BC3121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3121 001/09138 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
302 Barnard Hall
Daniela Kempf 3 14
Fall 2017: ENGL BC3121
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3121 001/09841 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
302 Barnard Hall
Daniela Kempf 3 16

ENGL BC3123 Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking. 3 points.

Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit. Enrollment restricted to Barnard students.

Speaking involves a series of rhetorical choices regarding vocal presentation, argument construction, and physical affect that, whether made consciously or by default, project information about the identity of the speaker. In this course students will relate theory to practice: to learn principles of public speaking and speech criticism for the purpose of applying these principles as peer tutors in the Speaking Fellow Program.

Fall 2017: ENGL BC3123
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3123 001/05613 Th 10:00am - 11:25am
325 Milbank Hall
Pamela Cobrin, Daniela Kempf 3 12
ENGL 3123 001/05613 T 10:10am - 11:25am
406 Barnard Hall
Pamela Cobrin, Daniela Kempf 3 12

ENGL BC3196 Home to Harlem: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students.

In the spring of 2016, ENGL 3196y will be centered on the relationship between art, activism and social justice as this relationship was developed during the Harlem Renaissance and beyond. Exploring the cultural contexts and aesthetic debates that animated Harlem in 1920s to 1930s, the course will focus on the politics of literary and theatrical production, and explore the fashioning and performance of New Negro identity through fiction, poetry, essays, and artwork, with special attention to theater/performance. This course will partner with Harlem's National Black Theater and work toward an understanding of the relationship between art/literature and socio-political change through the NBT's spring 2016 production of Dominique Morisseau's Blood on the Root, a multi-genre performance piece on racial injustice inspired by the 2006 Jena Six case in Louisiana.

English Theatre

ENTH BC3140 Women and Theatre. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date, time, and location that sign-up sheets go up is listed here: http://english.barnard.edu/sign-ups

Exploration of the impact of women in theatre history--with special emphasis on American theatre history--including how dramatic texts and theatre practice have reflected the ever-changing roles of women in society. Playwrights include Glaspell, Crothers, Grimke, Hellman, Finley, Hughes, Deavere Smith, and Vogel.

ENTH BC3144 Black Theatre. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Exploration of Black Theater, specifically African-American performance traditions, as an intervening agent in racial, cultural, and national identity. African-American theatre artists to be examined include Amiri Baraka, Kia Corthron, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angelina Grimke, Langston Hughes, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Adrienne Kennedy, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrian Piper, and August Wilson. Fulfills one (of two) required courses in dramatic literature for Theatre/Drama and Theatre Arts major.

Spring 2017: ENTH BC3144
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENTH 3144 001/03482 Th 11:00am - 12:50pm
407 Barnard Hall
Pamela Cobrin 4 20/15

Environmental Science

EESC BC3019 Energy Resources. 3 points.

Energy Resources utilizes the physical plant of Barnard and Columbia to involve students in a semester long real-life policy study that explores the interconnections between energy resources and sustainable energy efficiency. Students work collaboratively as a team and interface with college faculty, administration, staff and student organizations to produce and disseminate a professional level policy report describing existing usage of energy, analyzing where change is needed.

EESC BC3300 Workshop in Sustainable Development. 4 points.

Students address real-world issues in sustainable development by working in groups for an external client agency.  Instruction in communication, collaboration, and management; meetings with and presentations to clients and academic community.  Projects vary from year to year.  Readings in the course are project-specific and are identified by the student research teams.

Fall 2017: EESC BC3300
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EESC 3300 001/05986 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
530 Altschul Hall
Martin Stute 4 12
EESC 3300 002/04398 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
530 Altschul Hall
Martin Stute 4 3

History (Barnard)

HIST BC2567 Women, Gender and Sexuality in the 20th Century U.S.. 3 points.

Using an intersectional framework, this course traces changing notions of gender and sexuality in the 20th century United States.  The course examines how womanhood and feminism were shaped by class, race, ethnicity, culture, sexuality and immigration status.  We will explore how the construction of American nationalism and imperialism, as well as the development of citizenship rights, social policy, and labor organizing, were deeply influenced by the politics of gender.  Special emphasis will be placed on organizing and women's activism.

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I would also like to change the title of the course (couldn't figure out how to do this on-line) to:

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Women, Gender and Sexuality in the 20th Century

Fall 2017: HIST BC2567
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 2567 001/07622 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
324 Milbank Hall
Premilla Nadasen 3 41/52

HIST BC2664 Reproducing Inequalities: Families in Latin American History. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores changing structures and meanings of family in Latin America from colonial period to present. Particular focus on enduring tensions between "prescription" and "reality" in family forms as well as the articulation of family with hierarchies of class, caste, and color in diverse Latin American societies.

HIST BC2681 Women and Gender in Latin America. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines the gendered roles of women and men in Latin American society from the colonial period to the present. Explores a number of themes, including the intersection of social class, race, ethnicity, and gender; the nature of patriarchy; masculinity; gender and the state; and the gendered nature of political mobilization.

HIST BC2803 Gender and Empire. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines how women experienced empire and asks how their actions and activities produced critical shifts in the workings of colonial societies worldwide. Topics include sexuality, the colonial family, reproduction, race, and political activism.

HIST BC2865 Gender and Power in China. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).

This course explores the power dynamics of gender relations in Chinese history and contemporary society. Specifically, we seek to understand how a range of women--rulers, mothers, teachers, workers, prostitutes, and activists--exercised power by utilizing available resources to overcome institutional constraints.

HIST BC3323 The City in Europe. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preference to upper-class students. Preregistration required.

A social history of the city in Europe from early modern times; the economic, political, and intellectual forces influencing the growth of Paris, London, Vienna, and other urban centers.

HIST BC3870 Gender and Migration: A Global Perspective. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required. Sophomore Standing.

Explores migration as a gendered process and what factors account for migratory differences by gender across place and time; including labor markets, education demographic and family structure, gender ideologies, religion, government regulations and legal status, and intrinsic aspects of the migratory flow itself.

HIST BC3879 Feminist Traditions in China. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Background in Women's Studies and/or Chinese Studies helpful, but not necessary. Sophomore standing. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Explores the intellectual, social and cultural grounds for the establishment and transmission of feminist traditions in China before the 19th century.  Topics include pre-modern Chinese views of the body, self, gender, and sex, among others.  Our goal is to rethink such cherished concepts as voice, agency, freedom, and choice that have shaped the modern feminist movement.

HIST BC3901 Reacting to the Past II. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. Preregistration required. Reacting I, a First-Year seminar, is recommended.

Collision of ideas in two of the following three contexts: "Rousseau, Burke and Revolution in France, 1791;" "The Struggle for Palestine: The British, Zionists, and Palestinians in the 1930s," or "India on the Eve of Independence, 1945".

HIST BC3999 Transnational Feminism. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required.

Examines the theory and practice of transnational feminist activism. We will explore the ways in which race, class, culture and nationality facilitate alliances among women, reproduce hierarchical power relations, and help reconstruct gender.  The course covers a number of topics:  the African Diaspora, suffrage, labor, development policy, colonialism, trafficking, consumerism, Islam, and the criminal justice system.

Philosophy

PHIL UN2110 Philosophy and Feminism. 4 points.

Is there an essential difference between women and men? How do questions about race conflict or overlap with those about gender? Is there a "normal" way of being "queer"? Introduction to philosophy and feminism through a critical discussion of these and other questions using historical and contemporary texts, art, and public lectures. Focus includes essentialism, difference, identity, knowledge, objectivity, and queerness.

Fall 2017: PHIL UN2110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2110 001/19570 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
833 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Christia Mercer 4 95/110

History-East Asian

HSEA W4888 Woman and Gender in Korean History. 4 points.

While the rise of women's history and feminist theory in the 1960s and 1970s fostered more general reevaluations of social and cultural history in the West, such progressions have been far more modest in Korean history. To introduce one of the larger challenges in current Korean historiography, this course explores the experiences, consciousness and representations of women Korea at home and abroad from premodern times to the present. Historical studies of women and gender in Korea will be analyzed in conjunction with theories of Western women's history to encourage new methods of rethinking "patriarchy" within the Korean context. By tracing the lives of women from various socio-cultural aspects and examining the multiple interactions between the state, local community, family and individual, women's places in the family and in society, their relationships with one another and men, and the evolution of ideas about gender and sexuality throughout Korea's complicated past will be reexamined through concrete topics with historical specificity and as many primary sources as possible. With understanding dynamics of women's lives in Korean society, this class will build an important bridge to understand the construction of New Women in early twentieth-century Korea, when women from all walks of life had to accommodate their "old-style" predecessors and transform themselves to new women, as well as the lives of contemporary Korean women. This will be very much a reading-and-discussion course. Lectures will review the readings in historical perspective and supplement them. The period to be studied ranges from the pre-modern time up to the turn of twentieth century, with special attention to the early modern period.

Human Rights Studies

HRTS BC1025 Human Rights in Theory and Practice. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Provides a broad overview of the rapidly expanding field of human rights. Lectures on the philosophical, historical, legal and institutional foundations are interspersed with weekly presentations by frontline advocates from the U.S. and overseas.

Spring 2017: HRTS BC1025
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HRTS 1025 001/05170 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
903 Altschul Hall
J. Paul Martin 3 47/55

Music

MUSI BC3139 Introduction to Vocal Repertoire: Technique in Singing and Performance. 3 points.

This course is designed for developing singers. Group vocalizing, learning of songs and individual workshop performances are aimed at improving the student's  technical skill and the elements necessary to create a meaningful musical and dramatic experience. Attention to text, subtext, emotional and psychological aspects of a piece and the performer's  relationship to the audience are included in the work. Repertoire is predominantly in English and comes from both classical and popular traditions Individual coaching sessions are available with the class accompanist and help strengthen the students' confidence and skill. The class culminates with an in-class performance.

Spring 2017: MUSI BC3139
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3139 001/04804 F 2:00pm - 3:45pm
405 Milbank Hall
Josephine Mongiardo 3 11
MUSI 3139 001/04804 T 4:15pm - 6:00pm
225 Milbank Hall
Josephine Mongiardo 3 11
Fall 2017: MUSI BC3139
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3139 001/05250 F 12:00pm - 1:45pm
405 Milbank Hall
Jean-Paul Bjorlin 3 10
MUSI 3139 001/05250 M 5:15pm - 7:00pm
225 Milbank Hall
Jean-Paul Bjorlin 3 10

MUSI BC3140 Vocal Repertoire, Technique and Expression. 3 points.

Vocal exercises and exploration of wide-ranging repertoires, styles, and languages of the Western European song tradition. The rich variety of English, French, Italian and German poetry and music from the Baroque period through the Twentieth Century allows the student to experience both the music and the cultural environment of each of these styles. Attention is given both to meaning oftext and musical interpretation. Individual coaching sessions are available with the class accompanist and help strengthen the students' confidence and skill. The class culminates with an in-class performance.

Spring 2017: MUSI BC3140
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3140 001/06010 F 12:15pm - 2:00pm
405 Milbank Hall
Jean-Paul Bjorlin 3 9
MUSI 3140 001/06010 M 5:30pm - 7:15pm
225 Milbank Hall
Jean-Paul Bjorlin 3 9
Fall 2017: MUSI BC3140
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3140 001/04279 F 2:00pm - 3:45pm
405 Milbank Hall
Josephine Mongiardo 3 14
MUSI 3140 001/04279 T 4:15pm - 6:00pm
405 Milbank Hall
Josephine Mongiardo 3 14

MUSI V3462 Music, Gender and Performance. 3 points.

Prerequisites: there are no prerequisites for this course.

This seminar explores relationships between gender, music and performance from the perspective of ethnomusicology, cultural anthropology, critical music studies, feminist and queer theory and performance studies. We examine debates around issues of sex and gender and nature and culture through the lens of musical performance and experience. Some questions we consider include: In what ways is participation in particular music dictated by gendered conventions? What social purpose do these delineations serve? What might music tell us about the body? What is the relationship between performance and the ways in which masculinity and feminity, homosexuality and heterosexuality are shaped? How can we think about the concept of nation via gender and music? How might the gendered performances and the voices of musical celebrities come to represent or officially "speak" for the nation or particular publics? How does music shape our understanding of emotion, our experience of pleasure?

Philosophy

PHIL UN2110 Philosophy and Feminism. 4 points.

Is there an essential difference between women and men? How do questions about race conflict or overlap with those about gender? Is there a "normal" way of being "queer"? Introduction to philosophy and feminism through a critical discussion of these and other questions using historical and contemporary texts, art, and public lectures. Focus includes essentialism, difference, identity, knowledge, objectivity, and queerness.

Fall 2017: PHIL UN2110
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2110 001/19570 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
833 Seeley W. Mudd Building
Christia Mercer 4 95/110

Political Science (Barnard)

POLS BC3300 * Colloquium on Political Participation and Democracy. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS BC1001 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Examination of the role of citizen participation in the development of American democracy. Topics include movements of women, workers, racial minorities and students; community organizing; voting, parties, and electoral laws; and contemporary anti-corporate movements. Syllabus.

POLS BC3331 * Colloquium on American Political Decisionmaking. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Readings on decisionmaking, policy analysis, and the political setting of the administrative process. Students will simulate an ad hoc Cabinet Committee assigned to prepare a presidential program to deal with aspects of the foreign aid program involving hunger and malnutrition. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program and by the Athena Center for Leadership Studies.)

POLS BC3332 * Colloquium on Exploring Political Leadership in the U.S.. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Exploration of the effect of political leadership on political outcomes in the United States, with special attention to how individual characteristics, like personality, political style, ideology, gender, race and class, interact with the political environment in shaping political outcomes. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program and by the Athena Center for Leadership Studies.)

POLS BC3402 The Comparative Politics of Gender Inequality. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).

Prerequisites: Not an introductory-level course. Not open to students who have taken the colloquium POLS BC 3507. Enrollment limited to 20 students; L-course sign-up through eBear. Barnard syllabus.

Uses major analytical perspectives in comparative politics to understand the persistence of gender inequality in advanced industrial states. Topics include: political representation and participation; political economy and capitalism; the historical development of welfare states; electoral systems, electoral quotas; the role of supranational and international organizations; and social policy.

Fall 2017: POLS BC3402
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3402 001/04616 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
502 Diana Center
Claire Ullman 3 16/20

POLS BC3521 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. 3 points.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent. Not an introductory-level course. Not open to students who have taken the colloquium POLS BC3326. Enrollment limited to 25 students; L-course sign-up through eBear. Barnard syllabus.

Explores seminal caselaw to inform contemporary civil rights and civil liberties jurisprudence and policy.  Specifically, the readings examine historical and contemporary first amendment values, including freedom of speech and the press, economic liberties, takings law, discrimination based on race, gender, class and sexual preference, affirmative action, the right to privacy, reproductive freedom, the right to die, criminal procedure and adjudication, the rights of the criminally accused post-9/11 and the death penalty. (Cross-listed by the American Studies and Human Rights Programs.)

Fall 2017: POLS BC3521
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3521 001/04891 T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
323 Milbank Hall
Paula Franzese 3 54/60

POLS BC3805 *Colloquium on International Organization. 4 points.

Prerequisites: POLS V1601 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus.

Exploration of the various structures, institutions, and processes that order relations among states and/or actors in the international system. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary issues such as dilemmas of humanitarian intervention, the politics of international institutions, the rise of non-governmental organizations, and globalization.

POLS V3313 American Urban Politics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Patterns of government and politics in America's large cities and suburbs: the urban socioeconomic environment; the influence of party leaders, local officials, social and economic notables, and racial, ethnic, and other interest groups; mass media, the general public, and the state and federal governments; and the impact of urban governments on ghetto and other urban conditions. As of academic year 2016-2017, this course is now POLS 3213.

POLS V3615 Globalization and International Politics. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Explores how globalization affects the structures and functions of the international economy, state sovereignty, international security, and international civil society. Emphasis on problems of international governance, legitimacy and accountability, and the evolving organizational processes that characterize contemporary international politics.

POLS V3675 Russia and the West. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

An exploration of Russia's ambiguous relationship with the West, focusing on the political,cultural, philosophic,and historical roots of this relationship, as well as its foreign policy consequenses. Cases are drawn from tsarist, Soviet, and post-Soviet periods. Special emphasis is placed on issues of political economy and international security.

POLS W4316 The American Presidency. 3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or any course that qualifies for the the introductory-level American Politics course. Barnard syllabus. \n \n "L" sign-up through eBear.

Growth of presidential power, creation and use of the institutionalized presidency, presidential-congressional and presidential-bureaucratic relationships, and the presidency and the national security apparatus. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program.)

Psychology (Barnard)

PSYC BC1136 Social Psychology. 4.5 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).

Prerequisites: BC1001 and departmental permission. Enrollment limited to 50 students. Laboratory fee: $30.

Survey of contemporary theory and research on social thought and behavior. Issues such as person perception, attitudes, attraction, aggression, stereotyping, group dynamics, and social exchange will be explored. The application of theory and research to addressing social problems will be discussed.

PSYC BC1138 Social Psychology. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: BC1001 or permission of the instructor.

Lecture course covering contemporary theory and research on social thought and behavior. Issues such as person perception, attitudes, attraction, aggression, stereotyping, group dynamics, and social exchange will be explored. The application of theory and research to addressing social problems will be discussed.

Spring 2017: PSYC BC1138
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1138 001/00241 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
202 Altschul Hall
Robert Brotherton 3 151

PSYC BC2151 Organizational Psychology. 3 points.

Prerequisites: BC1001 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment strictly limited to 45 students; decided upon and finalized first week of classes.

Introduction to behavior of individuals and small groups in work organizations. Recent theory and research emphasizing both content and research methodology. Motivation and performance, attitudes and job satisfaction, power, influence, authority, leadership, cooperation and conflict, decision making, and communications. Enrollment limited to 45; and only seniors. 

Spring 2017: PSYC BC2151
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2151 001/07185 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
405 Milbank Hall
Ariel Bernstein 3 37/40
Fall 2017: PSYC BC2151
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2151 001/07929 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
328 Milbank Hall
Ariel Bernstein 3 34/40
PSYC 2151 002/06191 T Th 4:10pm - 5:25pm
Ll103 Diana Center
Ariel Bernstein 3 35/40

PSYC BC3153 Psychology and Women. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and at least two psychology courses. Permission of the instructor required for majors other than Psychology or Women's Studies. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Examines how female experience is and has been understood by psychologists. Through an understanding of gender as a social construction and issues raised by the intersections of gender, sexuality, class, and race, the course will analyze assumptions about what causes us to be gendered and about how being gendered affects behavior.

Fall 2017: PSYC BC3153
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3153 001/01841 M 11:00am - 12:50pm
306 Milbank Hall
Wendy McKenna 4 16

PSYC BC3166 Social Conflict. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).

Prerequisites: BC1001 and one additional Psychology course. Or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Survey of the literature on development of social conflict, the motivations and cognitions of individuals in conflict, and the procedures available for resolving conflict. Particular emphasis will be placed on the psychology of fairness and its implications for conflict resolution.

PSYC BC3364 Psychology of Leadership. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Students must have one of the following pre-requisites for this course: PSYC BC1125 Personality Psychology, PSYC BC1138 Social Psychology, or PSYC BC2151 Organizational Psychology, and permission by the instructor.

An in-depth examination of the concept of leadership in psychology with an emphasis on women’s leadership. Topics include the role of gender, culture, and emotional intelligence as well as an examination of transactional and transformational models. Topics will be discussed with an equal emphasis on theory, research, and application.  Students must have prerequisites and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15.

Spring 2017: PSYC BC3364
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3364 001/08514 W 11:00am - 12:50pm
306 Milbank Hall
Tara Well 4 14

PSYC BC3379 Psychology of Stereotyping and Prejudice. 4 points.

Prerequisites: (PSYC BC1001) Permission of the instructor.

Review of current literature from experimental social psychology pertaining to stereotyping and prejudice. Topics include: functions and costs of stereotyping, the formation and maintenance of stereotypes, and stereotype change. Recent research concerning the role of cognitive processes in intergroup perception will be emphasized.

Fall 2017: PSYC BC3379
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3379 001/02355 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
501 Diana Center
Steven Stroessner 4 26

Religion

RELI V3650 Religion and the Civil Rights Movement. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examination of the role of religion in the drive for civil rights during the 1950s and 1960s. The course will look at the role of activists, churches, clergy, sermons, and music in forging the consensus in favor of civil rights.

RELI W4610 Science, Nature, and Religion in 20th Century America. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examination of the relationship between scientific and religious ideas, with particular reference to American culture in the twentieth century. Explores the impact of such events as the Scopes trial and the popular faith in science and technology of the religious attitudes and beliefs of 20th-century Americans.

RELI W4670 Native American Religions. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Limited to 20 students.

Examines the varieties of Native American religions and spirituality, from contact to the present, including a look at the effects of European religions on Native American traditions.

RELI W4721 Religion and Social Justice. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Sophomore standing.

Examines current debates on three topics (religious reasons in public discourse, human rights, and democracy). Also looks briefly at some uses of the Exodus story, focusing on Michael Walzer's study of its political uses, Edward Said's criticism of Walzer's use of it in connection with contemporary Israel, and its role in debates among African Americans in the nineteenth century.

Science and Public Policy (Barnard)

SCPP BC3335 Environmental Leadership, Ethics & Action. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Prerequisites: One year of college science. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Instructor's permission requirement. Contact D. Dittrick.

Reviews environmental literature to examine consequences of human interaction with Earth's ecosystem. Module I: The Individual: Relationship of Humankind to Natural World. Human role in environmental decline. Module II: The Community: Coming Together for Greater Good. Key theories of environmental ethics and social justice. Module III: Environmental Stewardship: Successful Models of Leadership. Student teams research and create stewardship projects. Science, non-science, fiction, and non-fiction texts.

Sociology (Barnard)

SOCI BC3903 Work and Culture. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Preference for Barnard Leadership Initiative participants, Juniors and Seniors. Permission of the instructor.

Sociological approaches to understanding work and culture. Theoretical underpinnings of workplace interactions, with attention to ethnographies of work across a range of organizations. Examines changes in work due to technological advances and globalization. Special emphasis on gender.

SOCI BC3907 Communities and Social Change. 4 points.

Examines how changes in the economy, racial composition, and class relations affect community life-how it is created, changed and sometimes lost-with a specific focus on the local urban context. Student research projects will address how contemporary forces such as neoliberalization, gentrification and tourism impact a community's social fabric.

SOCI BC3909 Ethnic Conflict and Unrest. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing. SOCI BC1003 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Post-1965 immigration in the U.S. has prompted conflicts between new immigrant groups and established racial and ethnic groups. This seminar explores ethnic conflict and unrest that takes place in the streets, workplace, and everyday social life. Focus is on sociological theories that explain the tensions associated with the arrival of new immigrants.

SOCI BC3913 Inequalities: Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality in U.S. Law and Society. 4 points.

This class will examine the historical roots and ongoing persistence of social, economic, and political inequality and the continuing role that it plays in U.S. society by examining how such issues have been addressed both in social science and in law.

Spring 2017: SOCI BC3913
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3913 001/05930 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
502 Diana Center
John Salyer 4 29

SOCI BC3935 Gender and Organizations. 4 points.

This course examines the sociological features of organizations through a gender lens. We will analyze how gender, race, class, and sexuality matter for individuals and groups within a variety of organizational contexts. The course is grounded in the sociological literatures on gender and organizations.

SOCI UN3235 Social Movements: Collective Action. 3 points.

Prerequisites: One introductory course in Sociology suggested.

Social movements and the theories social scientists use to explain them, with emphasis on the American civil rights and women's movements.  Topics include theories of participation, the personal and social consequences of social movements, the rationality of protest, the influence of ideology, organization, and the state on movement success, social movements, and the mass media.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3235
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3235 001/01592 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
324 Milbank Hall
Marnie Brady 3 22

SOCI UN3264 The Changing American Family. 3 points.

Worries and debates about the family are in the news daily. But how in fact is "the family" changing? And why? This course will study the family from a sociological perspective with primary emphasis on continuity and change and variation across different historical eras. We'll examine how the diversity of family life and constellations of intimacy and care are shaped by gender, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and sexuality.   Discussion section (required) will engage with readings as well as events in the news/ social media of interest to students.  

SOCI W3675 Organizing Innovation. 4 points.

This course examines major innovations in organizations and asks whether innovation itself can be organized. We study a range of forms of organizing (e.g., bureaucratic, post-bureaucratic, and open architecture network forms) in a broad variety of settings: from fast food franchises to the military-entertainment complex, from airline cockpits to Wall Street trading rooms, from engineering firms to mega-churches, from scientific management at the turn of the twentieth century to collaborative filtering and open source programming at the beginning of the twenty-first. Special attention will be paid to the relationship between organizational forms and new digital technologies.

SOCI V3220 Masculinity: A Sociological View. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: One introductory course in Sociology is suggested.

Examines the cultural, political, and institutional forces that govern masculinity. Focuses on various meanings of "being a man" and the effects these different types of masculinity have on both men and women. Explores some of the variation among men and relationships between men and women.

SOCI V3318 The Sociology of Sexuality. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.
Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Introductory course in Sociology is suggested.

Social, cultural and organizational aspects of sex in the contemporary United States, stressing the plural in sexualities: sexual revolution and post-Victorian ideologies; the context of gender and inequality; social movements and sexual identity; the variety of sexual meanings and communities; the impact of AIDS.

SOCI V3324 Poverty, Inequality, and Policy: A Sociological Perspective. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Introductory course in Sociology is suggested.

Examination of poverty, the "underclass," and inequality in the United States. Part 1: The moral premises, social theories, and political interests shaping current debates about the poor. Part 2: A more concrete analysis of the lives of the poor and the causes of family breakdown, the drug economy, welfare, employment, and homelessness.

SOCI W3265 Sociology of Work and Gender. 3 points.

This course examines gender as a flexible but persistent boundary that continues to organize our work lives and our home lives, as well as the relationship between the two spheres. We will explore the ways in which gender affects how work is structured; the relationship between work and home; the household as a place of paid (and unpaid) labor; and how changes in the global economy affect gender and work identities.

SOCI UN3302 Sociology of Gender. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: One introductory course in Sociology suggested.

Examination of factors in gender identity that are both universal (across time, culture, setting) and specific to a social context. Social construction of gender roles in different settings, including family, work, and politics. Attention to the role of social policies in reinforcing norms or facilitating change.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3302
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3302 001/05599 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
409 Barnard Hall
Marnie Brady 3 27/35

SOCI W3936 Sociology and the Public. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Sociological Imagination (SOCI V1202) or The Social World (SOCI W1000) (not required).

This course explores how sociologists address pressing public concerns. With a focus on contemporary American issues, we will discuss: (1) how particular problems are identified; (2) what resolutions are put forth, who is likely to achieve them, and how; (3) what the audience is (and should be) for such work.

Theatre

THTR UN2005 Acting Workshop. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).
When offered in Fall semester, open only to first-year students.

Prerequisites: Acting classes are open to all Barnard and Columbia undergraduates. Permission of Theatre Department through audition required: auditions for acting classes and for the semester's stage productions held 6pm on the first Tuesday and Wednesday class days of each semester. Acting classes begin meeting after auditions. For required details, consult "Auditions" on the Barnard Theatre Department website in advance: theatre.barnard.edu/auditions.

Course develops the processes and tools an actor needs to approach the text of a play. Students develop their physical, vocal, and imaginative range and skills through voice and speech exercises, work on non-verbal behavior, improvisation, and character development.  IN THE FALL SEMESTER OPEN ONLY TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS. Course encouraged for prospective BC Theatre and CU Drama and Theatre Arts majors.

Fall 2017: THTR UN2005
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
THTR 2005 001/07546 M W 10:10am - 12:00pm
Ll200 Diana Center
Crystal Finn 3 14
THTR 2005 002/00488 T Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
Ll200 Diana Center
James King 3 12

THTR UN3140 Performing Women. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students.

This course examines the category of "woman" as it is mobilized in performance, considering both a variety of contemporary performances chosen from a wide range of genres and a diversity of critical/theoretical perspectives.

Fall 2017: THTR UN3140
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
THTR 3140 001/05992 W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
Ll105 Diana Center
Shayoni Mitra 4 11

Urban Studies

URBS V3530 Urban Development: A Rubik's Cube of Policy Choices. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Must attend first class for instructor permission. Preference to Urban Studies majors. Only 16 admitted.

Using case studies, examines the rationale for urban development, the players involved and how decisions are made about the distribution of public and private resources. Studies the specific components of the development process and the myriad policy questions that large-scale development is meant to address. Examines the disconnect among stakeholders' objectives - the developer, the financial institution that pays for the project, the government and the community.

URBS V3550 Community Building and Economic Development. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Must attend first class for instructor permission. Preference to Urban Studies majors.

Community building has emerged as an important approach to creating an economic base, reducing poverty and improving the quality of life in urban neighborhoods. In this course, students examine the methods, strategies, and impact of community building on the economic, social, and political development of urban neighborhoods.

URBS V3920 Social Entrepreneurship. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Must attend first class for instructor permission. Preference to Urban Studies majors. General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC). Only 16 admitted.

Introduction to the main concepts and processes associated with the creation of new social enterprises, policies, programs, and organizations; criteria for assessing business ventures sponsored by non-profits and socially responsible initiatives undertaken by corporations; specific case studies using New York City as a laboratory. To be offered Fall 2011.

Women's Studies (Barnard)

WMST BC3131 Women and Science. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC II).

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students.

History and politics of women's involvement with science. Women's contributions to scientific discovery in various fields, accounts by women scientists, engineers, and physicians, issues of science education. Feminist critiques of biological research and of the institution of science.

WMST UN1001 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies. 3 points.

An interdisciplinary introduction to key concepts and analytical categories in women's and gender studies. This course grapples with gender in its complex intersection with other systems of power and inequality, including: sexuality, race and ethnicity, class and nation. Topics include: feminisms, feminist and queer theory, commodity culture, violence, science and technology, visual cultures, work, and family.

Spring 2017: WMST UN1001
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WMST 1001 001/63865 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
405 Milbank Hall
Laura Ciolkowski, Alexander Pittman 3 62/91

WMST UN3915 Gender and Power in Transnational Perspective. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 15.

Prerequisites: Instructor approval required

Considers formations of gender, sexuality, and power as they circulate transnationally, as well as transnational feminist movements that have emerged to address contemporary gendered inequalities. Topics include political economy, global care chains, sexuality, sex work and trafficking, feminist politics, and human rights.

,

If it is a small world after all, how do forces of globalization shape and redefine both men’s and women’s positions as as workers and political subjects? And, if power swirls everywhere, how are transnational power dynamics reinscribed in gendered bodies? How is the body represented in discussions of the political economy of globalization? These questions will frame this course by highlighting how gender and power coalesce to impact the lives of individuals in various spaces including workplaces, the home, religious institutions, refugee camps, the government, and civil society, and human rights organizations. We will use specific sociological and anthropological case studies, to look at how various regimes of power operate to constrain individuals as well as give them new spaces for agency.This course will enable us to think transnationally, historically, and dynamically, using gender as a lens through which to critique relations of power and the ways that power informs our everyday lives and identities. 

Fall 2017: WMST UN3915
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WMST 3915 001/02432 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
754 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Selina Makana 4 23/25

WMST V3312 Theorizing Activism. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Critical Approaches or Feminist Theory or permission of instructor.

Helps students develop and apply useful theoretical models to feminist organizing on local and international levels.  It involves reading, presentations, and seminar reports.  Students use first-hand knowledge of the practices of specific women's activist organizations for theoretical work.

WMST W4300 Advanced Topics in Women's and Gender Studies. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

This seminar considers the family at a historical and socio-technical juncture at which its form is both remarkably flexible and deeply intractable. The course begins with an overview of sociological and feminist scholarship on the family. We then examine how developments stemming from genetic science have spurred the emergence of new reproductive technologies over the last few decades and, in turn, novel forms of procreation and affiliation. To what extent do assisted reproduction practices, such as in vitro fertilization, prenatal diagnosis, and surrogacy, offer novel ways for constituting and conceptualizing the family? Which constituencies benefit from these possibilities, which enable them, and which are constrained by them? To what extent do clinical and reproductive genetics privilege biological relatedness and, therefore, traditional gender ideologies? How is the family now simultaneously case as a source of (health) risk, a necessary resource for optimal (healthy) living, and a volitional social form? We will take up these questions against the backdrop of forms of kin-keeping sociality (family reunions, genealogy, etc.), on the one hand, and, on the other hand, "biosociality" and biological affinity. Readings include works by Cartsen, Engels, Franklin & McKinnon, Furstenberg, Nelkin, Povinelli, Katz Rothman, Strathern and Weston. 

WMST W4301 Early Jewish Women Immigrant Writers: 1900-1939. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
Enrollment limited to 15.

Prerequisites: students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then.

Covers significant pre-Holocaust texts (including Yiddish fiction in translation) by U.S. Ashkenazi women and analyzes the tensions between upholding Jewish identity and the necessity and/or inevitability of integration and assimilation. It also examines women's quests to realize their full potential in Jewish and non-Jewish communities on both sides of the Atlantic.

WMST W4303 Gender, Globalization, and Empire. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I).

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Study of the role of gender in economic structures and social processes comprising globalization and in political practices of contemporary U.S. empire. This seminar focuses on the ways in which transformations in global political and economic structures over the last few decades including recent political developments in the U.S. have been shaped by gender, race, sexuality, religion and social movements.

WMST W4304 Gender and HIV/AIDS. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 15 students.

An interdisciplinary exploration of feminist approaches to HIV/AIDS with emphasis on the nexus of science and social justice.

WMST W4307 Sexuality and the Law. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Because this seminar emphasizes weekly discussion and examination of the readings, enrollment is strictly limited to 20 students. Please read and follow the updated instructions: 1) Interested students must write a 50-100 word essay answering the following question: "What background, experience or expertise do you bring to the discussion of Sexuality and the Law that will help inform and challenge the other 19 students in the class?"; 2) Include the following: your name, institution you are graduating from, year of graduation, declared major, and whether you are working towards a Women's Studies major or minor; 3) Send your information and essay through email with the subject line "Barnard Sexuality & the Law"; 4) Send your email to Riya Ortiz, WS Department Assistant, at sortiz@barnard.edu no later than Wednesday, September 1, 2010. The final list of students who are registered for the course will be announced on Friday, September 3, 12 pm. Classes start on Monday, September 13. (Note: Students who have registered for the course must also submit the essay to guarantee their registration).

Explores how sexuality is defined and contested in various domains of law (Constitutional, Federal, State), how scientific theories intersect with legal discourse, and takes up considerations of these issues in family law, the military, questions of speech, citizenship rights, and at the workplace.

WMST W4308 Sexuality and Science. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Examines scientific research on human sexuality, from early sexology through contemporary studies of biology and sexual orientation, surveys of sexual behavior, and the development and testing of Viagra. How does such research incorporate, reflect, and reshape cultural ideas about sexuality? How is it useful, and for whom?

WMST W4309 Sex, Gender and Transgender Queries. 4 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Sex, sexual identity, and the body are produced in and through time.  “Trans” – as an identity, a set of practices, a question, a site, or as a verb of change and connection – is a relatively new term which this course will situate in theory, time, discipline, and through the study of representation.

WMST W4320 Queer Theories and Histories. 4 points.

Enrollment limited to 20.Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

The course will cover a range of (mostly U.S. and mostly 20th-Century) materials that thematize gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender experience and identity. We will study fiction and autobiographical texts, historical, psychoanalytic, and sociological materials, queer theory, and films, focusing on modes of representing sexuality and on the intersections between sexuality and race, ethnicity, class, gender, and nationality. We will also investigate connections between the history of LGBT activism and current events. Authors will include Foucault, Freud, Butler, Sedgwick, Anzaldua, Moraga, Smith. Students will present, and then write up, research projects of their own choosing.